F*** Your Racist History
F*** Your Racist History

Episode 109 · 3 months ago

Juan Crow: Anti-Latinx Racism in America

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

In the aftermath of the Mexican-American War, the anti-Latinx violence that continued to dominate Texas became state-sanctioned as it seeped into federal policies. During the early 20th century, Mexican citizens began to migrate into the United States to seek refuge from the Mexican Revolution's violence and turmoil. In response, the U.S. government sent Texas Rangers and soldiers to the border. Thousands of Mexican-Americans were lynched, burned alive, or brutally murdered by local ranchers, vigilante mobs, law enforcement, and the Army. "Juan Crow" laws codified discrimination against Latinx people in voting, employment, housing, education, and other key areas of life. And in the 1950s, President Dwight D. Eisenhower's "Operation Wetback" program deported as many as 1.3 million Latinx immigrants, including 25-percent of all immigrants in Texas. For decades, U.S. health authorities also used noxious, often deadly chemicals like Zyklon B (the same chemical gas used to kill Jews during the Holocaust) to delouse Mexicans seeking to cross the border into the United States. Our story includes the account of the 1917 Bath Riots at the Santa Fe Bridge, when Carmelita Torres decided to fight back, and it sparked a massive resistance. We also trace the history of other violence and discriminatory policies targeting Latinx peoples and the continued anti-immigrant sentiment that still exists towards them today.

...***Note: This transcription service has errors. Correct versions of the script for each episode are available at https://www.fyourracisthistory.com/scripts. At the heart of america is a dirty andshameful reality. Every one knows it exists, but the devastating impact thatis left on generations of people has been glost over and even ignore, especially by those who still benefitfrom that to our american history is rooted and races. More obvious chapters include thedecimation of native american populations, slavery, segregation andthe jim pro most americans have learned about, or at least heard of theseevents, but ask them about the genis movement or when home grown extremistsfilled madison square garden for a nazi ran or how henry ford's hatred, jews,helped inspire adolph hitler and you're likely to get a plank stare it's timeto explore these overlooked events that don't make it into our history booksand correct a record for the people harmed by them. The trace are passed tomodern tragedies and learn how folks over the sentries have fought back. Weneed to confront our racist history so that we might have a chance to defeatit once and full and christian peachey, the former whitesupremacist, who became an anti racist actinise and a bringer of hard truth oneach episode of ef. Your racist history. You learn about america's convenientlyoverlooked. Racist origin stores join in as we lank off the hood and exposethe lives behind some of america, so called triumphs and heroes come and take it. It's the slogan thatadorns a simple black and white flag featuring a cannon in the signature,texas, lone star, although the phrase has roots dating back to antiquity,texans adopted it during the eighteen, thirty five battle of gonzales thatkicked off the texas revolution, winning texas its decade: longindependence as a republic. Current senator ted crews of texas,recently brandished the same imagery in slogan, on a medical face mask whiletravelling to sunny cancun mexico, giving his constituents back at homethe cold shoulder as their pipes froze this past winter, while the hypocrisy seemed lost on thesenator. His critics quickly pointed out the long and tumultuous historybetween texas and mexico. Ever since the come and take it battle of gonzalesflag was first flown on december. Twenty, ninth eighteen,forty five following a decade of its self declared independence. As arepublic, texas, officially became the twenty eighth state in the union. However, mexico never recognized texanindependence and threaten the united states with war, should it annex the socalled lone star state, which is exactly what happened from eighteen, forty, six untileighteen, forty eight an armed conflict between the two nations known as themexican american war raged. When all was said and done, nearlyforty two thousand soldiers and civilians were dead, includingseventeen thousand americans. The us declared victory over mexico andtalk immediately turned to debate over the treaty terms with manifest destiny and mine. Someconservative, which were called democrats at the time like senatorstephen douglas of illinois, eline themselves with the all mexico movementand supported the total annexation of mexico. However, others, like senator john ccalhoun of south carolina, opposed it on racial grounds. In a speech hedelivered to congress in eighteen, forty eight, he proclaimed quote.

We have never dreamt of incorporatinginto our union any, but the caucasian race, the free white race toincorporate mexico would be the first instance of the kind of incorporatingan indian race for more than half of the mexicans areindians and the other is composed chiefly of mixed tribes. I protestagainst such a union as that. Our sir is the government of a white race. Arewe to associate with ourselves as equals companions and fellow citizens,the indians and mixed race of mexico? Mister president, i would consider sucha thing fatal to our institutions. Instead, an alternative was proposedand passed. The treaty of guadalupe i dalgo reduced mexico's land mass bymore than half an included parts of modernday california, new mexico,nevada, utah, arizona, colorado, wyoming, oklahoma, kansas and, ofcourse, texas. The newly defined border along the riogrande river wouldn't prove easy to cross in either direction. Some of the first border patrols wereslave catchers. Looking to capture self emancipated people from crossing intomexico and the texas rangers first formed in the eighteen tis who focusedon removing native americans from west texas following the mexican american wararmed with a large budget, the texas rangers began attacking various tribesin the region. It didn't stop until almost every indigenous tribe wasdriven from texas. The rangers then focused on keeping thepeace by implementing violet vigilanti quote justice against innocent peopleof mexican descent. The exact number of people, the texasrangers lynched between nineteen ten on nineteen twenty is unknown. One surviving record of one thousandnine hundred and fifteen states that rangers executed over three hundredtahamas mexican america inhabitants of texas, who they suspected of beingmexican citizens without verification of ron doing for even trial rangers, took pictures early selfies onhorseback standing over the bodies of those they had just murdered and turnedthem into post cards to send back home. Eventually, the state of texas launchedan investigation that disbanded some of these texas rangers units andimplemented more stringent procedures, but the damage was done. This is episode nine of fur, racisthistory, one crow, anti latinac racism inamerica. If you listen to episode seven whitehomeland part one. You already know that racist sentiment toward mexicanand lant next people in white america was rampant throughout the unitedstates before the civil war, especially in the south. The knights of the golden circle wantedto create a slavery empire by invading mexico and enslaving every person ofmexican descent. They believed, as did many every day,white americans of the time that mexicans were akin to native americansand african americans and therefore so called racially inferior to whites as new railroads along the mexicanborder began to usher in generations of white people to us border towns in thelate nineteenth century and their...

...populations boomed. These racistattitudes and tensions didn't improve despite a growing american dependenceon non white labor. Let's look at the texas city of el pasoand her mexican neighbors udan hares. For example. At the turn of the twentieth century,al paso's population was just fifteen thousand and juarez was just eightthousand y nineteen. Twenty their respectivepopulations had increased to over. Seventy seven thousand and twentythousand el paso on the us side relied heavilyon a work force of mexican labourers who crossed the border each day to workas domestic servants, railroad employees and other semi skilledworkers and then went home to mexico. Each night, citizens of el paso and neighboringtowns could reap the benefits of cheap mexican day laborers without having toco exist with them as residents in the city, but in nineteen ten, the thirty oneyear regime of mexican president porphyrio dias, came to an end andmexico plunged into revolutionary chaos. These border towns in the united statesbecame landing zones for mexican citizens fleeing the violins. One tenth of mexico's population cameto the us during the decade of nineteen ten on nineteen twenty, as a result of quickly developingpopulation diversity, fearful white taxin ushered in familiar racist lawslike segregation, pole, taxes and legal maneuvers to keep latinos from owningland white's. Only signs went up inestablishments across southern texas and california. This is an era in america referred toas one crow a twist on a somewhat more familiar jim crow. It had the sameracist formula as the reconstruction era, laws that affected black americansin the south, but was aimed squarely at lat. Next people looking for a betterlife in the land of the free once again, white americans, weren't having along the border outbreaks of typhus, adisease prevalent in crowded living conditions with poor sanitation, onlymade things worse. Several years before the customs andborder control agency was created for the mexican american border,politicians in california and texas deployed stringent health regulationsto control immigration. This almost exclusively impactedmexicans coming to and from mexico into the united states. Then in nineteenfifteen and nineteen sixteen typhus outbreaks along the border sentamerican health officials into a frenzy before antibiotics. The disease couldquickly get out of control and crowded communities causing flu like symptomsthat often progressed to liver and kidney failure, internal bleeding andeven death. By january nineteen, seventeen, themayor of el paso tom lee, a notorious germophobia, led with paranoia overcatching typhus, called for a full quarantine against all mexicanscrossing the border. He even sent a telegram to president woodrow wilson inwashington d c. Given that may or lees city wascompletely dependent on mexican day laborers to keep the local economyrunning a full quarantine was ill advised, so extreme delousingprocedures were employed instead, driven by racist stereotyping andendorsement by medical professionals who claimed mexicans in general,carried the disease, inhumane delousing...

...procedures, examinations, enforcedvaccinations soon became the norm for transient mexican workers crossing intothe united states. Let me paint a picture for you of whatthis was like: you're living in a home south of theunited states border each day you cross into the united states to work a job.It's well known that americans, at the time, were desperate for foreignworkers to cook clean and maintain their railroads for them. They payhigher wages in the us than in mexico. So you go willingly when you get to theborder you're, greeted by stern, faced border guards who look you up and downbefore directing you to a bath house to be inspected by one of the doctors onstaff. Only after a rigorous inspection and inhumane hygiene regiment. Will yoube allowed to continue down the road to your job once inside the bathhouse you'reinstructed to strip off your clothing alongside other members of your samegender men in one room, women in the other? If you're male and the doctorinspecting you says you have lice you'll shave, your head force you intoa chemical bath and put your clothes in a steam dryer. The dryers often were so hot. Theymelted your shoes. If you are a woman, they wash your hairand cerise and vinegar. A mixture believed at the time to kill buds. Your clothes are then doused in acyanide base. Disinfected such as zyklon, b, the same chemical that hitler's nazisdeployed in lethal quantities in concentration, camp gas chambers in n sto murder, jews, then you're sent on your way in yourmelted shoes. Hair dripping with kerosene in toxic gasped perfume have a blessed day every effing day m. To make matters worse, there wererumors that border security employees had been secretly photographing themexican women naked while they were being deloused and then circulating thepictures around town. A violent clash erupted between a groupof mexican people and border officials on january, twenty eighth nineteen.Seventeen, when a seventeen year old domestic worker named carmelita torres,decided she'd had enough of the cerasi baths and exploitation at seven. Thirty, a m on a sundaymorning, a public street car full of latina domestic workers was stopped atthe us border, like guards who told them to get off for a health inspectionbefore they could cross. Knowing that this meant beingdisinfected with a kerosene bath and the risk she might be secretlyphotographed, carmelina refused and rallied the other women to join her inprotest in just under an hour. Over two hundred women had joined her on thesanta fe international bridge into el paso by noon over one thousand men and womenwho had had enough of the humiliation and despair crowded the bridge andstopped all traffic from going into texas. The situation soon turned into a fullblown rebellion. The unrest lasted for two days and thecrowds eventually dispersed on their own, as other tensions kicked up along.The border congress was busy pushing through sweeping emigration reform. Theemigration act of nineteen seventeen included a provision that u s,presidents, had been vetoing for decades: literacy tests as early as the eighteen s nativists,like the know, nothings had proposed,...

...requiring immigrants to prove they knewhow to read before they could gain entry into the country. They saw thisas a way to keep out undesirables or any one who wasn't white or who waspoor. Us presidents, like grover clevelandand william howard, taft, consistently vidoe emigration bills that includedliteracy tests because most people agreed the practice was discriminatory.Adro wilson again vetoed an emigration bill in late nineteen, sixteen thatincluded such a provision. But by that time there were enough proponents ofthe measure that congress was able to override his veto. The emigration act of nineteenseventeen was officially passed on february five. Nineteen seventeen- whodid this effect- and why are we talking about this in our episode about latnext discrimination? Well, though, the immigration act onine hundred seventeen specifically reinforced elements of the chineseexclusion act and excluded emigrants from asian countries, literacy tested and posed. Coupled withthe increased head tax, i had to pay a feed of customs to actually get intothe country if you were a foreigner, directly impacted poor, mexicans andother latinic people who spoke mostly spanish, it expanded the list of undesirablesnot allowed in the country to include them and helped bolster racist nativessentiment throughout the country. Nineteen seventeen act was followed upby one thou: nine hundred and twenty one emergency quota act, which limitedthe number of each foreign nationality allowed to enter to three percent ofthe overall total us population. After that, the immigration act of a nineteen,twenty four reduced the quotas to two per cent for each nationality, plus it established the customs andborder control agency which took over governance of emigration along themexican and canadian borders. Racist and extreme hygiene, regimentsand literacy tests were not the only injustice as inflicted upon people ofmexican descent on this side of the border. In the early nineteen hundreds as the mexican revolution rage betweennineteen, ten and nineteen, twenty and various rebel groups led by leaderslike pancho and emiliano zapata, attempted to take control of mexico.Thousands of refugees fled the war torn country side and made their way northinto the united states, as this happened, bands of mexicanraiders also began crossing into the us and attacking border towns, pilferingfood and supplies and then escaping back across the border beginning innineteen. Ten. Most of these border towns were garrisoned with us soldiersto protect white land owners from the offshoots of revolutionary violence, conflicts between mexicanrevolutionaries and the. U s army during the next decade would becomeknown as the mexican border war in texas. The famous police force knownas the texas rangers, who by then had been in existence for almost onehundred years, was expanded and deployed to protect the interests ofwhite texans. New agents, known as quote loyaltyrangers, were sworn in to sniff out any hint of disloyalty within theircommunities n. Their addition increased the regularborder force from a hundred and fifty men to over eight hundred ommal. Your texas rangers, wherever youmay be i'll, tell you of some probos...

...that ha happened unto me. I can and heinformed us. Perhaps he thought it right before we reach the station byyour. Surely after fine tensions were exacerbated when a plot,known as the san diego plan was discovered by officials in nineteenfifteen, the document discovered inside a jailcell in san diego texas, detailed, an elaborate series of actions designed tohelp mexican rebels take back territories in texas, california,arizona and new mexico. According to the plan, rebels would supposedly kill all whiteamerican men over the age of sixteen sparing only the women, children andelderly and make the lands a haven for mexicans, native tribes and blackpeople. The author of the plan is unknown, as is the scope of who was involved, but the discovery of the document wasall the ammunition white supremacist at the time needed to whip the americanpublic into a frenzy. What followed was some of the worstracial violence in the regions, history, lynchings and mob violence becamerampant. It's estimated that the number ofpeople of mexican descent who were lynched along the border during thedecade of nineteen ten one nineteen twenty is anywhere from two hundred toseveral thousand. According to the organization refusingto forget, dator quote extra legal executions became so common that a sanantonio texas, reporter observed that finding of dead bodies of mexicanssuspected for various reasons of being connected with the troubles has reacheda point. Where creates little or no interest and quote who perpetrated this violence: local law enforcement and whitevigilantes, but the real boogy men of the era, especially in the rio grandevalley, where the government sanction texas rangers. In fact, the conduct of the texasrangers toward mexicans and other minorities during this period was sosuspect that it prompted a state investigation into the entire force innineteen nineteen texas state representative, jose tomascanalis. The only mexican american serving in state government at the timelaunched the investigations on the charges that certain texas rangers hadthreatened. The life of a mexican american constable ordered the deathsof numerous mexican men tortured men in order to obtain confessions andmurdered suspects. While in their custody, rather than turning them overto the court system, during the two week hearing a jointcommittee of the texas state senate and the house of representativesinterviewed eighty witnesses and produced over one thousand pages oftranscript, the interviewers ranged from cattlefarmers to ranch hands to army kernels their testimony varied betweensteadfast love for and loyalty to the texas rangers and stating that it wascommon knowledge that the rangers harassed, beat and murdered. Peoplebelieved to be mexicans during the investigation.Representative canalis was repeatedly harassed and threatened for bringingcharges against the rangers. A very famous texas, ranger, frankhamer, who has known best for taking...

...down, outlaws, bonny and clyde duringthe great depression. Reportedly stalked canalis and his familyeventually prompting, can alice to introduce a bill to overhaul the texasrangers completely. In spite of the shocking testimonyheard at the hearing and hamer's behavior toward canalazo, and the investigation was closed withthe texas rangers being exonerated of any and all misconduct, frank hamer was made to apologize tocanalis for harassing him, but remained in good standing on the force. Despite the failure of the bill, therewere some reforms that came about because of canalis's bravery. He sawthe end of the loyalty rangers and there were more stringentqualifications put in place for future ranger candidates. In general, there was a greater air ofaccountability within the fighting force for whatever that's worth theaftermath of the mexican revolution from one thousand nine hundred and tenone thousand nine hundred twenty resulted in political instability. Many who had survived the decade longrevolution migrated north into the united states. They wanted peace, theywanted opportunity, they wanted a bloodless future fortheir children. Unfortunately, these mexican immigrantsintent on accepting america as a new home were not met with a warm welcome by thine is the lat next population, inlos angeles, was pushing two hundred and fifty thousand tensions betweenmexican americans and white in ella had been simmering for nearly a decade bythe time the zoo suit riots erupted from june. Third to june, eighth, onnine hundred forty three zout suits became popular among youngergenerations of latine americans enamored, with jazz music and dancehalls in t e n es. They called themselves pachuca's and they foughtagainst their latin cultures, forced assimilation into white america. The stylish dress suit consisted of anoversized jacket that went down to the wearer's knees, baggy pants and dressboots. Over time, the suits became associatedalmost exclusively with black and latino men and, unsurprisingly, aracist stereotype of criminality was pinned to their lapels. Zut suits, became a symbol of juveniledelinquency and wearers were harassed in the streets, the actual cataclysmic event thatignited the zou'd suit riots. As still hotly debated some say, the murder of the latinoyouth named jose diaz, often called the sleepy lagoon murder during which theyoung man was found unconscious on a sidewalk after a fight at a party andlater died was a precursor to the riot. However, the murder occurred a fullyear before the riot and the trial that convicted seventeen mexican americanboys for the murder ended in january nine tuned. Forty three others argue the five days of violentclashes were the result of an incident that occurred later that year on maythirty. First, nineteen, forty three, as the story goes, a group of twelve usservicemen were walking down a street in los angeles when they spotted agroup of latino women. Eleven from the group crossed thestreet to talk to them. While another semen, joe darcy coleman, continueddown the sidewalk alone. He walked past a group of young mexicanamerican men, presumably wearing zutze.

A comment was made, a punch was thrownand coleman ended up in the hospital. The sailors claimed the zuider started,the fight and the patuca said the soldiers instigated it. The reality is that a multitude ofconflicts paved the way to the zupus riots. In fact, there were severalother incidents of service men traveling in packs to hunt down suitsuitors in the months leading up to this. Some estimates put the clashes between:u s: military personnel and young latinac civilians at once. A week. The difference between these previousincidents and the full blown zotta ryots was the length of time thisunrest continued for, as well as the incredible nationwide press coveragethat was clearly in favour of the servicemen hunting down brown, skinned,kids and young men on june. Third, fifty sailors left the los angelesnaval reserve center with revenge on their minds. They took a blitz of taxi cabs intodowntown and every time they saw a latino in a zoot suit. They leaped fromtheir cars, beat the wearer to a bloody pulp and stripped him naked in thestreets. Soon hundreds of servicemen weretrolling. The streets looking for latinos to beat up some of the brutalized patuca were asyoung as twelve years. Old military commanders eventually barredservicemen from entering certain areas, in los angeles, where violence was theworst, but only after several nights of fighting hundreds of people were arrested. It was bloody chaos, but the papersplayed a very one. Sided blame game. Most of the newspaper headlines duringthe riots touted that service men were simply taking revenge against the socalled violent, zoot seers one la times headlines on june. Seventhto nine hundred and forty three red quote: zut suitors learn lesson in fights withservicemen. What did the police have to say aboutthis rash of violence against the latine population? Well, according to newspapers like thewisconsin state journal police at the time said, the servicemen were justquote: raising a little hell. The fighting calmed down after theninth of june and serious questions were publicly raised about the racialmotivations behind the attacks on tune. Ten mayor, boren of los angeles, issueda statement saying that there was no racial discrimination involved in thezoot suit gang bryants quote. I informed the state departmentthat assurances could be given to the mexican embassy that the occurrences inthis city are not in any manner directed in mexican citizens or evenagainst persons of mexican descent. There is no question of racialdiscrimination involved. End quote right: just cleaning up the undesirables again as tensions between middle class,whites, police and lat. Nec youth reached a boiling point. In los angeles,the united states government was looking for a solution to a possiblelabor shortage brought on by our entrance into world war. Two on andnine hundred forty one as american men were drafted into thearmy and sent to europe in the pacific. Women and people of color stepped up tofill factory jobs, but what about infrastructure jobs thatrequired hard manual labor? The united states solution wassomething called the brasserie, an agreement between the american andmexican governments to supply able body mexican men under short term laborcontracts to come and work in the united states during its twenty two year run overfour point: six million labor contracts...

...were signed under the brasero programme. On the surface, the program lookedprogressive. The official plan promised good housing,affordable quality meals, fair wages and transportation back to mexico whentheir contract ran out, but in practice employers exploitedtheir mexican laborers by providing substandard housing, starvation wagesand ranson food, while reaping the financial rewards of a cheap laborforce, in addition to over promising and underdelivering on their working conditions. The brasero program mandated intensivephysical inspections akin to the border hygiene practices happening in bordertowns like el paso mexican men applying to the braseroprogram were subjected to not one but two physical examinations that includedchest x, rays, invasive tests for sexually transmitted diseases,psychological evaluations and, of course, a toxic chemical bath. Many of the braseros were processed infacilities around el paso, texas and transported across the border inrailway cars used for cattle m. Seen that before once there they would be stripped hosedown and deloused while importing these temporary migrantworkers. The united states was also deporting millions of people back tomexico, with the federal deportation initiative, officially called no jokeoperation wet back after president dwight d, eisenhower'sattorney general herbert brownell junior visited southern california onthousand nine hundred and fifty three. He made it his mission to deport allundocumented workers, many of whom were being transported into the unitedstates by employers looking to pay cheap laborers under the table. The mexican government was also leaningon the us to stem the flow of people leaving their country. The eisenhower administration launchedoperation wet back in tousin teen, a d. Fifty four upon the initiatives inception. Manyundocumented workers went back to mexico on their own, largely in partdue to effective media campaigns over estimating the might of the borderpatrol and terrorizing mexicans in the process in texas, sixty three thousand peoplewere repatriated to mexico, without emigration and naturalization serviceor ions involvement, the ions even touted that theiroperation wetback initiative was so effective. They were able to deportupwards of one point: one million people, while substituting braserolaborers in any vacated jobs for employers who had lost workers becauseof the initiative. This programme received a lot ofsupport, especially from the mexican government, which was losing itsvaluable labor force across the border. At a rapid pace and to us, labor groupswho claimed undocumented laborers were driving wages down and decreasing thestandards of living for naturalized citizens. Illegal immigration didn't cease to bea thorn in the side of the american government. However, after the cancellation of the braseroprogram on thousand nine hundred and sixty four that next people, desperatefor higher paying work and better living conditions, again began comingacross the border in greater numbers than ever before, american politicianshave been unable to find a solution ever since, though, there have beenmany efforts to punish these emigrants...

...as a deterrent to undocumentedmigration back politics now and another big signof voter discontent to share a record number of individual issues placeddirectly on the vallet or the most controversial california, immigrationinitiative, proposition o hundred and eighty seven in one thousand nine hundred and ninetyfour. In the face of an economic downturn, california, legislators andrepublican activists were looking for a scapegoat and who better to blame foreconomic hardship. An undocumented workers, republicans were exceedingly popular inthe state at the time, soon started a campaign for proposition hondred andeighty seven, a measure that would bar all undocumented residents from usingstate sponsored programmes. This included public health clinics,public schools and welfare programs. The law also required public servantsto report people's immigration status to the state's attorney general'soffice. That included teachers and doctors support for proposition on hundred andeighty seven received fifty nine per cent of the vote, but the day after itwas approved, civil rights groups like the american civil liberties union andthe mexican american legal defense and education fund hurled lawsuits at it tokeep it from taking effect. After three years of legal limbo.Proposition hundred an eighty, seven was stalled by a federal judge, whoruled an unconstitutional and issued an injunction to this day. The case against it hasnever officially been dismissed and is instead under a permanent federalinjunction. The introduction of proposition hundredan eighty seven proved to be detrimental to the republican party incalifornia. The state's large number of latinac andasian american voters were neither reliably republican nor democrat, buttheir allegiance turned blue. After proposition o hundred and eighty sevenwas introduced, california has largely considered ademocratic stronghold now and that's partly thanks to opposition forproposition one hundred and eighty seven illegal immigration and thesituation at the united states. Mexican border has remained the subject ofheated political debate for decades. Once again, the united states southernborder became a point of national interest during donald trump's, twothousand a d. Sixteen presidential campaign trump's promises around immigration,extended well past a physical border wall. He promised to remove millions ofquote criminal immigrants who are in the country both illegally and legally,as well as removing protections for over seven hundred and forty thousandlat necks immigrants and their us born children, daca or deferred action for childhoodarrivals is an obama arapooish that has allowed some individuals who wereunlawfully brought into the. U s's children to receive a renewable twoyear period of deferred action from deportation and become eligible for awork, permit trump attempted to end dacka, but thesupreme court ruled the move unlawful in two thousand seventeen. However, onjuly sixteenth, two thousand twenty one: u s, district judge andrew hannan ruledin favor of texas and eight other conservative states that had sued tohalt the dock a programme. Those who are already enrolled won'tlose protection, but the decision bars the processing of new applications. It also restricts. President joe bidenhas been committed to protecting daca from keeping it or a similar program inplace. Another federal judge in texas hadpreviously barred en forcement of...

...bidens. One hundred days stay on mostdeportations. This new ruling puts further pressureon congress to act on much needed emigration policy reform following trump selection, zenophobiaracism and violence directed at latine people increased astronomically in theunited states. The center for the study of hate andextremism at california, state university san bernadino found that inthe two weeks, following the two thousand, a d, sixteen election ofdonald trump hate crimes targeting lat next people increased by one hundredand seventy six per cent over the previous year's daily average. Those are just the known incidents.Many people pulled said that they were too afraid to report incidents ofviolence against them for fear they are a loved one, might be deported ortargeted further. In august, two thousand and nineteen a walmart store in el paso texas, wasthe target of one such heinous hate crime. A twenty one year old white man walkedinto the store with a rifle and started shooting shoppers. He had driven over eleven hours fromhis home near dallas texas and had selected the store specifically becauseit was often used by people from the mexican american community less than twenty minutes before hewalked into the building. He posted his manifesto on a popular whitesupremacist website. The document is a racist, ran, batoocalled quote hispanic invasion of texas. When the gunman walked back out of thewalmart. Twenty people were dead, two more would die in the hospital anda further twenty six were left wounded at the time of this recordingprosecutors are seeking the death penalty. This attack is one of the deadliestanti lat next hate crimes in the united states. To date, systemic discrimination against thelatex community in the united states clearly continues to day the associatedpress, detailed conditions inside it, customs and border patrol detentioncenter in clink, texas were allegedly two hundred fifty infants. Children andteenagers are being held according to the ap there's, not adequate food,water or sanitation inside the report describes tan mothers and other youngerkids being asked to care for infants and toddlers on their own with littleor no help from any adults mass over crowding and bordered attention.Facilities, coupled with the lack of access to basic necessities, poses aserious threat to many immigrants, health and safety. A recent american civil liberties unionarticle details how detention centers run by us, immigration and customsenforcement officials take advantage of those protesting. The abhorrentconditions with hunger strikes with little else to take away fromdetainees. Protesters in these detainment prisons are often met withviolence, like pepper spray, rubber bullets, solitary confinement withoutaccess to running water, an involuntary medical procedures. Sadly, there's little change at theborder from a government perspective, even though there is support amongregistered voters or providing pathways to citizenship in a june two thousand and twenty onepull. Seventy two per cent of respondencesaid they support the dream, act, the development relief and education foralien miner's act, which would provide a pathway to citizenship and protectionfrom deportation for dreamers or...

...undocumented people who came to thecountry as children and have grown up in the us. Sixty three per cent of voters supportnot only a pathway to citizenship for dreamers, but also for immigrants whowork in essential industries and temporary protected status holders whoface violence or natural disasters in their home countries. When mexico sends his people they'renot sending their best they're, not sending you they're not sending you they're, sending people that have lotsof problems and they're bringing those problems with us, they're bringing drugs they're,bringing crime their rapist and some, i assume, a good people. It shouldsurprise nobody that even generations after the battle of gonzales, the zoo,suit riots or carmelita torres's bath riots, the people like former presidentdoald trump and his supporters would still revel in the unfounded idea ofpeople of latinac, origin being sinister or so called subhumans becauseof the color of their skin. It's also not a big leap from thoseracist and irresponsible words uttered on american television by a sitting uspresident, only a few years ago to rhetoric in a statement by the el passoshooter who sat in his manifesto quote. If we can get rid of enough people,then our way of life can be more sustainable and quote, and it's not afar cry to think that words like rapists criminals, an invasion mightcontinue to be a call to violent action. These slurs, against latinac people inone form or another, have been inspiring racist violence for a verylong time, while america has arguably made someprogress. The pity, of course, is that we've had to spend a half a millenniumfighting white supremacy from within just to get to where we are now still struggling with many of the sameage. Old issues, unjust treatment at the border, such asthe denial of basic civil rights like due process and extended detention andunsafe facilities, are just a few of them to day. But there are many more no podcast can cover the expanse ofracism that america has levied against latex, americans and people of color,but i hope ours sparks a curiosity in you to want to learn more, just as itdid for me. I have to warn you, though, once you get started down the path ofdiscovering the truth behind these issues. They're, like russian nesting dolls,you pull one apart and find more hiding within. We can't make or measure progresswithout knowing the truth of how and where it all began. It's time wefigured that out and faced up to it. That's all for to day join me next time,as we shine a light on another shameful chapter of our country's racist path.We can't beat the problem if we can't see it. You've been listening to fourracist history. If you like what you've heard, do us a favor and rate us onwhichever platform you listen, it helps you can get more information on thisand other episodes at f. U racist history com for on your favorite,podcast ap fur racist history is produced by gold note and distributedby sounder. This episode was researched, fact, checked and written by maggiecome and jasmine brand links to source material and references are included inthe show notes. Our editor is kem. Pendola music is courtesy of flat foot.Fifty six jamie mole is our producer...

...and i'm the executive producer and yourhost christian pea children. Thank you for joining, see you next time and isalways f your racist history.

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