F*** Your Racist History
F*** Your Racist History

Episode 104 · 10 months ago

Blocking the Ballot Box

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

The fight for fair elections in the United States is as old as the country itself. From the Electoral College, to gerrymandering, to violent attacks on voting rights advocates, to dark money influencing campaigns, to new voter suppression laws introduced in 47 states in 2021, the concept of “one person, one vote” is still far from being realized. In this episode of F*** Your Racist History, we dig into the racist origins of U.S. elections and the ways politicians have spent centuries manipulating the system to keep their parties in power and disenfranchise American voters. The more things change, the more they stay the same.

...*** Note: This transcription service has errors. Correct versions of the script for each episode are available At https:// www. fyourracisthistory. com/ scripts. At the heart of America is a dirty and shameful reality. Every one knows it exists, but the devastating impact that is left on generations of people has been glossed over and even ignore, especially by those who still benefit from it to our American history is rooted in races. More obvious chapters include the decimation of native American populations, slavery, segregation in the Jim pro most Americans have learned about, or at least heard of these events, but ask them about the Lugena movie or when home grown extremists filled Madison Square Garden for a Nazi rag for how Henry Ford' s hatred of Jews helped inspire Adolf Hitler and you' re likely to get a plank scare. It' s time to explore these overlooked events that don' t make it into our history book and correct a record for the people harmed by them. The trace are passed to modern tragedies and learn how folks over The sentries have fought back. We need to confront our racist history so that We might have a chance to defeat it once and full and Christian Peachey, the former whites of premises, who became racist History. You learn about America' s conveniently overlooked. Racist origin stores join as we lank off the hood and expose the lives behind some of America, so called triumphs and heroes. What a great honor to be able to introduce for the first time ever anywhere. The forty fifth president of The United States of America, Donald J trump, when Americans cast their vote for president of the United States. Who exactly are we voting for? we check a box next to a candidate' s name, get an eye voted sticker to display on our lapels to signify. We' ve performed our civic duty and hope like hell, are chosen candidate winds, but in reality we aren' t actually casting a ballot for that person to represent us. Instead, we vote for a group of partisan electors selected well before the election by either the Republican or Democrat parties in our state to place our votes for us, then, depending on which presidential candidate gets the most votes in that state or wins the most congressional districts. the chosen group of electors then go to the United States capital in December and placed their boats, not necessarily yours for the next present. This process is called the electoral college and it' s how America has elected its president every four years since the ratification of the US constitution in seventeen. Eighty seven. Why, though, Why don' t we rely on the popular vote to choose our president? Whoever gets the most votes should win that privilege right. Like so many things in America, we need to go back to our country' s founding to understand why and where we are to day. This is episode for of Feu Racist History blocking the ballot box by seventeen. Eighty seven, the original signatories of the predecessor of the United States Constitution, the articles of confederation realized they had a looming problem. The federal government, under The articles, lack the power to do anything other than placidly exist. framers of the articles of confederation, hadn' t conceived the executive and judicial branches of government, yet which meant they couldn' t enforce federal laws. They also didn' t have a mechanism to collect much needed taxes, which meant they couldn' t fund a standing army and had to...

...rely on private malitias to put down unrest or to defend themselves against invasion. The thirteen original states maintained autonymous governments brokered their own trade agreements and kept independent currency systems. United States was hardly United at all. Something had to be done to foster co operation. If this fledgling nation was to survive at the constitutional convention in Philadelphia in Seventeen. Eighty seven, the framers set out the Sall of these problems and position the United States government. As Supreme Leader of the thirteen states, you may recognize some of the attendees George Washington, James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson and John Adams. A formation of an executive branch was paramount, but how would they elect some one to fill the highest office of the land by popular vote? Nope James Madison spent a few years reading every book he could about failed democracies of the past. He concluded that too much involvement in government by the people could lead to Moboro, spelling certain death for the New Democratic Republic. In other words, they felt too much democracy could inadvertently usurp their power and transfer it to those who were so called less reputably. You know like women and people of Color as a compromise between either a straight congressional or popular vote to elect the president. the framers instead outlined a system called the Electoral College, here' s the gist of how it works, but for every presidential election each political party proposes a slate of electors equal to the number of Representatives and senators in each state. As previously mentioned, when a citizen casts a vote for a candidate, they vote for the electors selected by that candidates party, not the actual candidate whose name they check on the ballot. Then after the general election happens in November every four years. the electors whose party won the general election go to Washington D C and cast their votes for their respective parties, candidate and of story, or is it while it' s rare? There have been five instances in us. History were a candidate who didn' t win the popular vote on the Oval Office, John Quincy Adams did it at eighteen, twenty four Rotherford be Hayes in Eighteen: Seventy six, Benjamin Harrison in eighteen, eighty, eight George W Bush in two thousand and most recently Donald J trump in two thousand and sixteen when he lost a popular vote to Hilary Clinton. Oh, are you happy you voted for me. You are so lucky that I gave You that privilege. So how exactly does racism fit into the electoral college equation? Well for one, the original framers baked it into what ' s called apportionment, which is a fancy word for figuring out how many representatives each state ultimately sends to Congress to place those votes for president, it ' s based on the American population, sensus count and at the constitutional convention in Seventeen. Eighty seven there was a massive argument about how to count enslaved, blacks as voters in the southern United States. I E were they people or property. The idea of a popular vote threatened southern slave owners, power and plenty of the US Constitution' s original drafters and signers were squarely in...

...the pro slavery camp. The southern states had roughly The same population density as The northern states, but one third of the South' s population was made up of enslaved people who had no rights and could not vote putting southern whites at a disadvantage in the event of an election of a president by popular vote at the time you can only vote if you paid taxes and you can only pay taxes if you were considered a person, for all intents and purposes, a white man at the constitutional convention. When the issue of taxation of slave property came up, white slave owners initially argued that they shouldn' t be taxed for enslaved people as whole people, because they believe blacks were inherently inferior to whites. Three fifths was the amount agreed upon that a slave owner should be taxed for a black slave. However, when the issue of elected representation for those same slaves came up, it was determined that a periodic senses of free citizens would dictate the amount of representation estate had in the federal government. The states with enslaved people suddenly did an about face and claimed their slave labor was just as valuable as free labor in the north and should therefore afford them just as much representation m northern delegates chided their sudden turnaround, arguing that if everyone agreed a black and slaved person was equal to just three fifths of a white person for the purposes of taxation, and that ratio should also be extended to enslaved people when discussing representation toward the end of the debates. the southern delegates threatened to walk away from discussions altogether. So both sides patched together a bi, partisan, compromised, outlined an article one section. Two of the United States, constitutionrepresentatives and direct taxes shall be apportioned among the several states which may be included within this union according to their respective numbers, which shall be determined by adding to the whole number of free persons, including those bound to service for a term of years and excluding Indians not taxed three fifths of all other persons notice. They didn' t say slave here. That' s because there were serious objections to using the word slave in a document that also declared all men were created, equal, even if in actuality, the framers of our constitution were forming a system of government designed to uphold the sanctity of white autonomy. It' s all about the optics. This compromise all but ensured the dominance of white slave holding politicians in American government until the civil war broke out in eighteen. Sixty one day, look at all of the numbers, all of the Poles, all of the math, all of the maps behind the road to o o d e and eighteen and a House majority for each national political parties like we know them today didn' t burst on to the scene with the country' s founding. They formed and grew over time as politicians learned how to consolidate power and exploit loopholes in the law. It did take long for politicians to figure out the drawing congressional district maps and specific ways had huge political advantages. Southern politicians started drawing their congressional maps toward large slave owning districts, starting with Virginia in seventeen eighty eight, but the practice gained its well known name of Jerry Mandering in Eighteen, twelve, when a governor from Massachusetts signed a bill allowing a controversial new re districting plan, elbridge...

Jerry was born in marblehead Massachusetts in seventeen, forty four he entered into politics in seventeen. Seventy two on the eve of the American revolution and became a founding father of the United States. He signed the Declaration of Independence, served on the Continental Congress and participated in the constitutional convention. After serving President John Adams as a foreign diplomat to France, Jerry retired from politics in the early eighteen, hundreds and settled into life as a business man in Massachusetts until he became so disgusted with the behavior of his political foes, the federalists that he re entered politics. A quick aside. Our current two party system of Democrat and Republican evolved from a host of other political parties from the early eighteen, hundreds, including the whigs, the federalist Party and the Democratic Republicans. The main differences between these parties are not important for today' s story. However, for Elbridge Jerry' s story just remember his political rivals. The federalists were for a strong central government and Jerry' s Democratic Republicans were for states rights, limited central government and saw themselves as the every man party Jerry came out of retirement in eighteen, ten to run for Governor of Massachusetts for the Democratic Republican Party, he claimed he did it to end partisan political warfare between his party and the federalists, but his actions, while in office were aggressively anti federalist. He had federalist Newspaper Editors Arrested for libel for speaking out against President James Madison' s foreign policy. He purged federalist officials from his State Government and replaced them with loyal Democratic Republicans. Finally, after the democratic Republican dominated legislature, redrew their state Senate districts to break up federalist, controlled areas, Jerry signed a bill that allowed for the unusual re districting plan that unquestionably benefited his party. Obviously, federalists were outraged over the redrawn map and soon jerry became the subject of Political Jabs, an artist named Elkana Tisdale dodle over Jerry' s map and turned his freakishly redrawn district into an outline of a mythical salamander that was printed in newspapers nationwide. Critics coined at the Jerry Mander and the name for this despicable vote rigging practice has stuck ever since the manoeuver soon became commonplace in American politics. Every ten years after performing the senses, the parties in power redrew congressional district lines to benefit themselves. In upcoming elections. They would use the tactic to either quote crack voting districts. I E break up groups of voters. They saw as harmful to their re election chances or quote pack them draw high numbers of voters together to lessen or bolster their impact on upcoming state and federal elections in time. Politicians also realized other ways to manipulate voting maps in their favor. The practice of splitting up communities of black and Brown voters to ensure they can' t elect a candidate that represents them as one that comes to mind. This form of racial Jerry mandering was popular in the south following the civil war. When newly freed black men tried to exercise their right to vote a run for office after the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified in Eighteen, seventy in a form of prison, Jerry Mandering, the Census Bureau, counts prisoners in the districts where they are incarcerated instead of in their home districts. Since most prisoners come from urban or largely black and brown populated areas and are imprisoned in rural, mostly white areas. This gives a...

...population boost and therefore more representation cloud to rural white prison towns versus the inmates home districts. This is a problem, in particular in Massachusetts with the towns of Bill Rica, Dartmouth, Deta, Framingham, Ludlow, Plymouth and Walpole. Each containing a precinct were up to thirty. Five per cent of the precincts representatives are directly attributable to the census. Bureaus prison. miscount voting districts are required to be drawn with an even distribution of residence, so one person one vote can generally be adhered to, but in every state except Maine and Vermont, as well as the District of Columbia, Falins can' t vote while incarcerated. Therefore, the vote of the person who lives in a small town with a large prison population has substantially more power than a person who lives in a large urban area, while prisoners bodies are counted to impact voting maps, even as their own voices can' t be included, falins only receive restoration of voting rights upon release in some states and others there not restored until after parole or probation is finished or after any restitution or outstanding fines are paid in other states, felons lose their voting rights indefinitely, or they require a governor' s pardon in order for them to be restored. Things used to be worse in this regard, numerous states of past laws to expand voting access to people with felony conviction, but despite these reforms, as of two thousand twenty over five million Americans remained disenfranchised and because black people have been disproportionally incarcerated, one out of every sixteen African Americans has lost her voting rights due to felony disenfranchisement laws versus one in every fifty nine non black voters. Although reforms have since been made to voting rights laws in Florida, the political impact that felony disenfranchisement laws can have were quite evident there. In a two thousand presidential election, even a nonviolent low level of fence like drug possession was counted as a felony and many drug offenders who never faced any jail time were barred from voting that year. The outcome of The Florida vote and of The two thousand presidential race came down to just a few hundred votes, but over two hundred thousand black men. Thirty one per cent of all African American men in the state at the time were not allowed to vote in that election during the reconstruction era that followed the civil war states retain control over who is allowed suffrage or the right to vote within their borders, even as it pertained to national elections. The Fourteenth Amendment adopted in eighteen sixty eight, however, guaranteed equal protection for all American citizens, regardless of skin color under the law superseding the three fifth compromise language in the Constitution, dispel it out further and ensure full citizen ship, writes for formerly enslaved people. Following the passage of the Fourteenth Amendment, Congress passed the Fifteenth Amendment, the rights of citizens of the United States devote shall not be denied or abridged by the United States or by any state on account of race, color or previous condition of servitude. The amendment was ratified in February of eighteen seventy and is often credited with finally enfranchising black men with the right to vote for native Americans. However, it wasn' t until the Snyder Act of nineteen twenty four which granted native Americans born in the United States, full citizenship that they could enjoy. I the rights granted by...

...the Fifteenth Amendment and in some states not until the N S, since it was left up to the states to decide who has the right to vote. the passage of the Fifteenth Amendment also exposed the racist fissure within the Women' s suffrage movement in America. Some white women of the American Equal Rights Association, like Susan B, Anthony and Elizabeth Katy, stand, who had been fighting for their own right to vote, since the eighteen is refused to support the ratification of this amendment because it didn' t provide universal suffrage for women. The American Equal Rights Association dissolved in eighteen sixty nine over the issue and Susan B Anthony and Elizabeth Katy Stanton formed the female. Only National Woman Suffrage Association. The group primarily worked towards White Women' s suffrage and often utilized racist talking points. After all, just because you are oppressed doesn' t mean you can' t oppress others. For example, Elizabeth Katy Stanton said that the fifteenth amendment quote creates an antagonism everywhere between educated refined women and the lower orders of men, especially in the south. As far As black women were concerned, the American suffrage movement all but omitted them black women faced oppression from all sides, both gendered and racial intersectional. Ty wasn' t yet in the American vocabulary will delve into the racism of the Women' s movement. In a later episode. The population of formerly enslaved people that had been used to inflate representation and government for slave states via the three fifth compromise could now in theory, represent themselves and their best interests, at least the black man. Unfortunately, racist had other plans. The Ku Klux clan established after The civil war by white supremacies ex confederate soldiers and military officers aimed to violently suppress these new black voters, their allies and, in some instances, White Republicans, keep in mind the more progressive Republican Party at this time in American history doesn' t reflect the modern day version that is associated with more conservative and sometimes racist values. The clan had become a full blown terrorist organization by The eighteen sixty eight election. There were at least one thousand politically and racially motivated murders in Louisiana and two thousand in Kansas alone and thousands more across the south in the lead up to election day. Harassment, beatings and other forms of intimidation were also rampant. New Orleans had twenty one thousand registered Republican voters, but only two hundred and seventy six would cast their votes in the wake of violence surrounding that election season. Plantation owners also took full advantage of their work force in more ways than one when it came to manipulating voting. Some proudly argued they gave their impoverish workers time off the boat and sometimes even drove them to the Poles themselves. This was an overt display of benevolence to promote the idea that they were just kind and law abiding southerners, an act that was meant to show the north that the south was rehabilitated, or even that there was nothing to worry about in the first place when it came to the disenfranchisement and treatment of formerly enslaved blacks. What was not on display, however, was their denial of fundamental voter education and the strong encouragement, often through violence, to vote for a particular candidate or candidates of the plantation owners. Choosing violent oppression didn' t apply only to voters, but black candidates and...

...any one deemed an ally as well. In fact, there wasn' t a serious black candidate for US president until George Edwin Turner ran in nineteen o four as an independent, his votes weren' t recorded by any state. Although estimates ranged from two thousand sixty five thousand votes nationally, the first black president would not be elected for over a century when Barack Obama made history in two thousand, eight representation in the United States government for people of Color still remains unequal to this day, while the current Congress is the most racially diverse in the history of the country. Only one hundred and twenty four or twenty three per cent of senators and representatives identify as Black Hispanic Asian Pacific Islander or native American. Despite forty percent of the US population identifying with those same communities in the Jim Crow, south wholly legal methods accounted for the most common form of racist disenfranchisement and voter suppression. Remember, the original version of the Constitution did not guarantee suffrage, nor did the fifteenth amendment. It merely stated that voting could not be denied based on race, color or previous condition of servitude. Pole taxes and literacy tests, however, could instead be used to prevent people of color and, in some cases, poor white men from voting as a reminder, generally, only men could vote at this point in history. Although some women could vote in newer Western states like Wyoming Pole, taxes, kept blacks, the working class and the poor from voting and were implemented, and at least twenty one states following the civil war, my name is Darry the Guildford a was born made it there. Nineteen twenty in Montgomery Alabama and I paid my poor day that year and Boatin I was neous in the end there by different protests, which I was Clar, because now I' m fifty cents was a Dolinas. These fees ranged from one dollar to three dollars, roughly thirty dollars to one hundred dollars in to day' s money. All that may not sound like a huge expense for the poorest people in society. At the time like servants, chair, croppers, factory workers and laborers, it could often come down to a decision between using that money to feed their families or paying the pole tax. Ask yourself how you might choose given the same circumstances. Literacy tests were another common method to circumvent minority voting in the Jim Crow South. The state of Louisiana test went something like this o. This test is to be given to anyone who cannot prove a fifth grade education, one wrong answer to NAT' s failure of the test. You had ten minutes to complete this test circle, the first, the first first better, the alphabet in this time. Why are they to first in the first circle below write the last letter of the first word, beginning with the letter, ll yeah? That' s where I' m like? I, what why is my head- hurt cross out the number necessary when making the number the low one million, but that doesn' t what that doesn ' t make sense to me. This is a literacy pis draw square with a trig in it, but in that same time, will dry a circle with a black dog. Talumni eye fell backwards forth a faster at questions. Oh God, God is Duryasa really competitive right now, like we have to I' m dead, I' m just giving up his hard. Could...

...you confidently pass this convoluted and confusingly worded test literacy tests like this wouldn' t be outlawed entirely until President Richard Nixon expanded the Voting Rights Act? I One thousand nine hundred and seventy a common phrase in American English grandfathered in is also derived from the Jim Crow era. When several states passed the law known as the grandfather clause, this racist law stated that if some one was allowed to vote before the Fifteenth Amendment was passed or if their ancestors, who were most certainly white, were allowed to vote and they were exempt from having to take literacy tests or pay poll taxes. They were therefore grandfathered end to the right to vote. We may want to rethink our current common usage of this phrase. These various legal barriers and intimidation tactics were effective on nineteen. Forty, only three per cent of eligible black voters in the south were registered to vote. Even one black voters did successfully cast a vote. Racist Jerry mandering prevented those votes from having any real impact on their representation by the nineteen is racist apportionment or the districting of politicians according to population was such an enormous problem throughout the United States that the? U S Supreme Court, agreed to hear a case about it. He nineteen forty six decision and Col Grove verses, green set a devastating precedent by removing all legal recourse available to voters who dared challenge these discriminatory district maps. The petitioner Kenneth W colgreve claimed at Congressional districts in his State of Illinois were so uneven in their population counts that it was unconstitutional, therefore, invalidating previous congressional elections, but the Supreme Court punted the responsibility away ruling the obligation to regulate a portion lay outside the court system. It was the duty of Congress. Basically, they put the power to stop racist and disenfranchising practices in the hands of the people, who were the very proponents of it great plan in one thousand nine hundred and sixty two case of Baker versus car. However, the Supreme Court ultimately reversed its decision. The case involved a lawsuit that alleged The Tennessee state legislature had redrawn districts outside of accordance with State Law. The district stuck with The Cold Grove precedent that this was a political matter, not something that the justice system should get involved with the claimin appealed and a Supreme Court ultimately made a decision stating that these cases were indeed under the purview of the court and breaches of state apportionment law were in violation of the equal protection clause. Under the Fourteenth Amendment to the US Constitution, then, at the height of the civil rights movement in March of Nineteen, sixty five over five hundred activists were attacked in a protest for fair and equal voting rights. During a planned March from Selma to Montgomery Alabama state troopers met peaceful protesters with violence using night sticks, dogs and Tier Gas. Many were left bloodied and beaten as they attempted to flee the police violence. Some of the brutality was captured on film and the day became known as bloody Sunday after the incident in Selma President Lynden B Johnson stepped in and signed the Voting Rights Act into law. What happened in Selma as part of a far larger movement which reaches into every section and State of America? It is the...

...effort of American Negroes to secure for themselves the full blessings of American life. Their cause must be our cause to because it' s not just Negros but really it' s all of us must overcome the crippling legacy of bigotry and injustice, and we shall overcome this act. Ain' t and predatory voter oppression laws and violence. It was intended to bolster the fourteenth and fifteenth amendments with the premise of one person. one vote by the end of nineteen sixty five over two hundred and fifty thousand more black people were registered to vote states like Mississippi, saw an increase in registered black voters from six point. Seven per cent on nineteen sixty five prior to the voting rights act passage to nearly sixty per cent on to nine hundred sixty seven. The initial voting rights act had limitations, though, for example, it only outlawed literacy tests and places with under fifty per cent nonwaterman registration in places that were mostly people of Color Literacy tests remained alive and well until President Richard Nixon expanded. The act in N S in part, this old provision had been included out of fear that southern Democrats would fill a buster or obstruct proceedings to avoid passing it at all. Unsurprisingly, the Voting Rights Act was not universally accepted. Eighty five representatives and nineteen senators voted against the bill. Only six of the people who voted in total were black yet again underscoring the lack of representation for people of Color and congress. While this was unprecedented in monumental legislation and made strides towards equity within our voting system, it ultimately had to be expanded five times to address all the Jim Crow era, oppression issues and, sadly, barriers to the ballot box have continued to plague our system. The year two thousand and ten was an especially bad year for voting rights. The? U S: Supreme Court, reversed long standing campaign, finance restrictions and expanded the influence of wealthy donors, corporations and special interest groups in our elections in the infamous citizens, United Versus Federal Election Commission case. There are a lot of functioning democracies around the world that work. This way where you can basically have millionaires and billionaires bank rolling, whoever they want. However, they want, in some cases, undisclosed and what it means is. Ordinary Americans are shut out of the process. A conservative non profit group called citizens united sued after the Federal Election Commission, blocked it from promoting an airing of film criticizing presidential candidate. Hillary Clinton, a five to four majority of the court sided with citizens, united ruling that corporations and other outside groups can spend unlimited money on elections as part of First Amendment protections so long as they are not formerly coordinating with a candidate or political party. As the Brendan Center notes quote, the justices, who voted with the majority assumed that independent spending cannot be corrupt and that the spending would be transparent, but both assumptions have proven to be incorrect. The creation of super packs or political action committees which empower very wealthy donors, as well...

...as the expansion of political spending from special interest groups and dark money through shadowy, non profits that don' t disclose their donors have all been a devastating blow to a fair democratic election process. Also in two thousand and ten Republicans version two point: Oh in this Bizaro political world took Jerry Mandrin to an entirely new level, dubbed Red Map. The RE districting majority project launched to target outlying Congressional district races with thin margins that would otherwise never get any attention from the National Party. Republicans funneled millions of dollars into flipping Democrat blue seats to Republican red. If they could take control in blue swing, states like North Carolina, Michigan, Wisconsin, Ohio and Pennsylvania, they would be able to redraw congressional maps in two thousand and eleven to help keep them in power. For the next decade, Unsuspecting Democrats campaigning for reelection and districts with narrow margins across the United States, suddenly found their voters besieged with mailed mud, slinging fliers and aggressive Muck raking television campaigns. The project was overwhelmingly successful in two thousand ten Republicans gained nearly seven hundred state legislative seats, the largest increase either party. I see in modern history by two thousand eleven. The side, swiped Democrats and newly empowered Republicans took turns redrawing their district maps to aggressively bolster their respective parties interests in the future. I don' t think any one will be shocked to learn the communities of color were quote cracked and packed to the benefit of white politicians all over the country. The merely decade long case of Abbot versus Perez Challenged district maps in Texas redrawn from two thousand eleven to two thousand and thirteen. The plainin this case argued that The redistribution not done in good faith and was intended to dilute black and Latin neck votes. They claimed it was in reaction to two thousand and ten census records that showed black and Latinac people accounted for nearly ninety percent of Texas' s growth between two thousand and two thousand a D ten. While state courts found several districts in breach of the Voting Rights Act and guilty of Rachel Jerry Mandering, the defendants appealed up to the: U S Supreme Court and the states ruling was overturned all but one house district h D. Ninety was ruled constitutional in their findings. Legislators were ordered to redraw the offending district in two thousand and nineteen. The Supreme Court has just issued a ruling in a case challenging part of a historic voting rights law. The law suit focuses on The federal government' s power to review any change in voting procedures. It applies to sixteen states where there is a history of discrimination against minority voters. One thousand nine hundred and sixty five voting rights act had included a provision that established a formula for the federal government to use in identifying jurisdictions with problematic histories of racial discrimination, so that they would need to get pre approval before changing their voting laws. But the Supreme Court' s decision into two thousand and thirteen shell be county versus holder case essentially gutted. The special provision, just as Ruth Bater Ginsburg, said gutting. The law that is helped in voter discrimination is like throwing away your umbrella in a rain storm because you are not getting wet. That means That now, in the wake of the recent senses for the first time in decades, as districts and states begin to draw their voting, maps are, as with a history of racist voting, practices won' t have to get pre clearance for their voting maps from the Justice Department in yet another move that disproportionately affects voters of color, despite in person, voter fraud being exceedingly...

...rare. Alabama Kansas, Mississippi, New Hampshire, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, South Carolina, Tennessee, Texas, Virginia and Wisconsin all past new voter identification laws in two thousand eleven or two thousand twelve. Some states have especially strict valid photo ID laws which require voters to present only one of a few forms of government issued photo ID in order to vote, even though, according to the American Civil Liberties Union, since two thousand quote, there were only thirty one, credible allegations of voter and personation during a time in which over one billion ballots were cast, these types of laws unfairly discriminate against black and Brown voters, of whom twenty five per cent don' t have a current valid idea as compared to roughly only eight per cent of white voters who don' t fraud when voting by mail is also incredibly rare. Yet many states require extensive signature, matching witness, affidavits, copies of photo identification and other barriers that make it easier to this card perfectly legal ballance, for example. The ACLO also found that at least ninety seven percent of discarded mail in ballots in Ohio from the two thousand and twenty elections were authentic. Many people weren' t even notified when their ballot had been discarded, despite it being a legal requirement to do so. Do you believe that elections are essentially ricked? What I mean by Rigous Ness? We have a right to vote in the United States that is afforded to eligible American citizens, but we have seen over the last twenty years a constriction on who has the right to use that right. We have seen it through the ride laws. You can' t get on the rolls and if You get on the rolls You can' t stay, you may not be able to cast your ballot because they close your precinct or they change the rules. That' s rigging. the game here suggested that voters suppression is more insiduous now in two thousand and nineteen that it was even in the s. How so we have always struggled with voter suppression, but what' s happened in the last twenty years, is that it' s gone under ground? It' s no longer hoses and laws. That say you cannot vote it. Is this insidious nature That says it' s race neutral that we' re just putting in these these laws in place for everyone? But we know that it has a disproportionate effect on the communities that have long been marginalized in response to record voter turn out in two thousand and twenty, as well as voting rights activist and past Goober, notorial candidate, stacy Abram' s, successful voter registration initiative in Georgia that helped turn to state blue for the first time since nineteen. Ninety two Republicans have produced a slew of new voter suppression bills in two thousand and twenty one aimed at making voting harder for most people. As of March Twenty four two thousand Twenty one. Three hundred and sixty one bills aimed at restricting voting axis, have been introduced in forty seven states. These bills include reducing access to early voter registration, early vote, casting an absent tea voting, a Sour Cherry on top of this kernel Sunday. Anticipating these changes will make voting on election day a much longer affair and may exclude the same people who have historically been under represented in some areas. palling places are even forbidden from handing out snacks and water to those who have long weights to vote. What' s worse, some of these new bills, regurgitate racist language from days gone by, for example, a Texas voter suppression bill recently introduced the phrase purity of the ballot box. Democratic Representative Rafiel, an KIA questioned the bill sponsor Republican Brisko Cane. But...

...whether or not he knew the origins of the terminology. Representative Kane admitted he had no idea. So anki proceeded to give the young representative a history lesson : Let' s roll the clip, you chose a peculiar term in drafting this bill and it' s on page one line. Twelve F, you have, you have a copy of the bill in front of you. I do get her and you talked about preserving the purity of the ballot box. Is that correct e? That' s a quotation from the Texas Constitution to be article six section four right, and are you aware of the history behind that provision of the constitution? I' M NOT! Okay. Are you aware that references to quote purity of the ballot box used throughout this country' s history has been a justification for states to disenfranchise groups? They deem unfit to vote or somehow lacking. I didn' t know that I thought it meant Mer speaker following this embarrassing spectacle. The particular phrase was stricken from the bill, but the covert racist principles behind it remain and at the time of this recording the bill is predicted to pass into law too many of us in our elected officials. Don' t know our history, you don' t care to address it, so we keep repeating it. So how can we change course? It would take a constitutional amendment which would require the votes of two thirds of both chambers of Congress, the three fourths of the states to get rid of the Electoral College. It would take the same to undue citizens united or a reversal by the Supreme Court, both of which are extremely unlikely in our current political climate. Advocates for abolishing the electoral college say, there ' s another possible way. A number of states of signed on to an agreement called the national popular vote. Interstate compact that guarantees their electoral college votes to the winner of the popular boat, no manner the outcome of their individual states. The compact would only go into effect whence The number of states involved surpasses the two hundred and seventy electoral college vote threshold that is required to win the presidency. As of November Five, two thousand twenty fifteen states in Washington d C adopted legislation to join the National Popular Vote Interstate Compact together they represent one hundred and ninety six electoral college votes, a legislative effort to vastly reform our electoral process is under way and is probably our best chance of getting fairer elections. We must push our elected officials to pass the for the People Act introduced on January, Twenty Fourth, two thousand Twenty one. It aims to include automatic voter registration and other steps to modernize our elections, a national guarantee of free in fair elections without voter suppression, coupled with a commitment to restore the full protections of the voting rights act, small donor, public financing to empower ordinary Americans instead of big donors and no cost of taxpayers, an other critical campaign, finance reforms and then to partisan jerry manner and a much needed overhaul of federal ethics rules. Critically, the act would thwart virtually every vote. Suppression Bill currently penning from the states job one to fight back against the...

...manipulation of democracy, is to reinforce and bolster the voting rights act not further pick it apart and dismantle it. The people working to restrict voting access are The same ones who benefit from fewer people. Voting. Remember that, to put it plainly, we' re in the middle of an existential crisis bit by bit year by year, hard fought rights that took decades to pass are being dismantled. It' s time, we fight for all citizens to easily exercise their right to vote and have it be counted. That' s offered to day join me next time, as we shine a light on another shameful chapter of our country' s racist path. We can' t beat the problem if We can' t see it. You' ve been listening to four racist history. If you like what you' ve heard, do us a favor and rate us on whichever platform you listen, it helps you can get more information on this and other episodes at F. U racist history, com for on your favorite podcast gap. Four racist history is produced by gold note and distributed by sounder. This episode was researched, fact, checked and written by Maggie, come and Jasmine brand links to source material and references are included in the show notes. Our editor is Ken Pendola Music is courtesy of flat foot. Fifty six jamie mole is our producer and I' m the executive producer and your host Christian Pechili. Thank you for joining, see you next time and is always F. Your racist history t.

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