F*** Your Racist History
F*** Your Racist History

Episode 103 · 10 months ago

Hate Sells...and We’re Buying

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

It is no secret that slavery rests at the foundation of American capitalism and is often synonymous with the sugar, tobacco, and/or cotton plantations that fueled the Southern economy. What many may not know is that slavery also rests at the foundation of many notable corporations. From New York Life to Bank of America, Brooks Brothers to Aetna, many companies have benefitted from slavery. Some of the companies even acknowledged their involvement in slavery and offered apologies in an attempt to reconcile their tainted history but, is an apology enough? What about products like Aunt Jemima that use racist imagery, sports teams with stereotypically racist mascots, or tobacco companies who aggressively market menthol cigarettes to people of color? In this episode of F*** Your Racist History, we explore racism and its infiltration of American consumerism.

...*** Note: This transcription service has errors. Correct versions of the script for each episode are available At https:// www. fyourracisthistory. com/ scripts. At the heart of America is a dirty and shameful reality. Every one knows it exists, but the devastating impact that is left on generations of people has been glossed over and even ignore, especially by those who still benefit from it. Our American history is rooted in racism. More obvious chapters include the decimation of native American populations, slavery, segregation and the Jim Prora. Most Americans about the Lugena' s movement or when home grown extremists filled Madison Square Garden for Nazi ran or how Henry Ford' s hatred, Jews, helped Inspire Adolph Hitler and you' re likely to get a plank stair it' s time to explore these overlooked events that don' t make it into our history books and correct the record for the people harmed by them. The trace are passed to modern tragedies and learn how folks, over the centuries, have fought back. We need to confront our racist history so that we might have a chance to defeat it once and full and Christian Peachey, the former white supremacies, who became an anti racist activist and a bringer of hard truths. On each episode of that, Your Racist History, you learn about America' s conveniently overlooked racist origin stories join in as we yank off the hood and expose the lines behind some of America, so called triumphs and heroes in one thousand, eight hundred and ninety three executives, a Pearl Milling Company in Saint Joseph Missouri, initiated a casting call for their new brand of self rising pancake mix. They needed a mascot and they wanted a living breathing embodiment of the brand ' s, namesake, aunt, Jemima and eighteen. Seventy five minstrel character, in other words they needed a jovial overweight, black woman to fit the part of a southern slave mammy at yourself is mornin response. A formerly enslaved woman from Kentucky named Nancy Green, who was working as a servant for a Chicago judge at the time auditioned for the role Pearl, Milling Company loved Green. She was in her es sported, impressive, culinary skills and also had the background to portray the company' s black mammy stereotype. They set her up in a booth at one thousand, eight hundred and ninety three Chicago world ' s fair to the delight of large crowds. Nancy Green, who downed a white apron around her full shape and a Red Bandana around her head, cooked pancakes, sang songs and regaled White Fargo Ers, with tails from her childhood and Southern Slavery. and now one of your own plantation saying it will pleasure termin you all that oothout. If I probably like Pearl Milling Companies, new pancake met Nancy Green as aunt Jemima was an instant success, but not every one was happy with the characterization Belican living like you. People as why hold out a e a day for my ba a lowin. All you round in a town, a critics at the time thought such a portrayal so soon after the legal end of slavery was inappropriate and perpetuated black stereotypes and that the company was cashing in. But this was the beginning of the Jim Crow era in the United States, and most Americans were lapping up in the Scalda over slavery in the old south popularity of the pancake mix continued to grow in in D, nine hundred twenty five quaker oats purchased the anthemion quaker och company makers of fine pods for the whole family present America, favored family, that on a area David and reck, not a word about one of them, an a fine quaker product and to my mo fast forward to June two thousand and twenty. In the wake of the murder of George Floyd, an unarmed black man by a white police officer in Minneapolis Minnesota. Amid the protests over Floyd ' s killing besieging the nation, an old forgotten video resurfaced on line and went viral. It was a four minute montage of over one hundred years of...

...racist, an Chamina advertising and people were outraged and they got a tempt late and ten live old plantation saying for us today and Tometimes at breakfast. Mostly, don' t never need no d quicker oaths responded quickly. Their Vice President Christen crept announced the retirement of the brand. Soon after on June. Seventeenth, in her statement she says quote: An Chamina origins are based on a racial stereotype, while work has been done over the years to update the brand in a manner intended to be appropriate and respectful. We realize those changes are not enough and to my Ma pancakes without her ser is like a spring without the there' s. Only one thing worse in this universe: That ' s no enstate decision to remove the racist brand and then started a ripple effect. Other brands, like cream of wheat uncle Ben' s, rice and Lando Lake' s butter, announced their intentions to re, evaluate their own branding decisions, all of which included racist stereotypes. If black or indigenous people heated debate among consumers ensued, some hail the decisions as a step towards anti racism and equity in marketing. Others argued it marked the Erratur of American history without acknowledging the Hamit caused and no surprise. There were some who completely pushed back on the idea that the racialism ges were even racist at all. What is our longstanding obsession with faulty and Racist Nostalgia, better questions? Why of these racist marketing tactics been so successful, and why do we remain loyal to these brands as consumers, despite their despicable histories and practices? It' s simple were willing to forget what truly happened in our history, because we wanted to feel cleaner and more respectful than it really was, and it' s hard to admit that maybe we are also complicity in the Marginalia and dehumanization of other human beings through our buying habits and which companies we choose to support. But the truth is racism is ingrained in more than just the Business Marketing Practices of the twentieth century. the belief in white supremacy is the foundation of American capitalism and it all started with something called the triangle trade. This is episode three of feraces history, hate cells and we are buying molasses rum slaves, harvest drink, repeat, maybe you remember something about this from school. Most likely you don' t if you were even taught it at all, but that' s the basic construction of the triangle, trade that built America ' s early colonial economy. It worked like this. The British colonies in The West indies were commonly known to day as The Caribbean were rich in sugar plantations and they decided they needed slaves to plant harvest in process. The sugar cane the production of sugar was one of the most brutal and dangerous types of work for enslaved people. They often lost limbs and suffered debilitating injuries at every stage at to mention the severe mistreatment they endured from slave owners. This, of course, bolstered the need for plantation owners to bring in even more enslaved people. They also found that refining sugar produced a more sought after by product molasis. The sugar alone was not profitable. Colassie was The real money maker ships carried millions of gallons of molasses from the West indies to the coast of New England, where distilleries then processed it into rum. The rum in turn would be placed in large, casks and transported to The African coast, where I would then be traded for more slaves, ships, hauling enslave people would then transport them to America' s southern colonies, and the whole vicious cycle would begin again. This Trans Atlantic slave trade continued to expand throughout the late. Sixteen hundreds by the early seventeen hundreds, the American colonies, were booming because of it by the eve of the American revolution in seventeen. Seventy six, the American colonies have become wealthy and self sufficient enough to declare independence from England he to their heathy economy, the triangle trade and slavery. It'...

...s often said the south was the epicenter for American slavery. In many cases, that is certainly true. Historian. Ronald Bailey has noted, however, that one of the greatest travesties in the case of US history is the suggestion that only the south benefited directly and substantially from slavery, something else that would have been difficult for white Americans to achieve without the exploitation of blacks as slaves. the industrialization of America' s north, as we just learned rum, was made with molasses derived from southern slave grown sugar cane, but Americans also smoked slave grown tobacco. In their pipes, an American textiles were made with slave grown cotton. In fact, after the United Kingdom ended the international slave trade In eighteen, O seven with the slave trade act, the use of southern US slave grown cotton in the northern textile industries sword beginning in seventeen. Ninety, the United States and enslaved peoples produced one and a half million pounds of rock cotton meeting. That' s how much total US produced. Cotton entered the market that same year, Eli Whitney invented the Cotton Gin and, as a result, the following year. Thirty five million pounds of cotton hit the US market, that' s over a two thousand percent increase in less than one year. If you look more closely, the explosion of the Northern American textile industry also followed, along with the staggering growth of cotton from the south in seventeen. Ninety northern textile industries used five million pounds of raw cotton in eighteen, sixty five. They used four hundred and thirty three million pounds. According to the B B C by some estimates, New York received forty per cent of US cotton revenue through money, its financial firms, shipping businesses and insurance companies earned, but it wasn' t just raw products in the revenue produced on the literal backs of enslaved people that northern companies profited from. It was also the enslaved people themselves that generated money for them. Slaves needed clothes on their backs, though. Let' s not forget that sometimes enslaved people were forced to pick cotton completely naked as a form of punishment. American clothier Brooks Brothers started their company in the early eighteen, hundreds by selling quote top of the line clothing to slave owners and white traders who needed to outfit their slaves. This company started here in New York City. We approach to be a part of that. One of the bed rocks of these companies Tina New York institution, an American company history, tradition, a sense of pride attention to quality and uncompromising standard the hand sous the Taylors, that craft they are brooks brothers. They are part of books, brothers, on Brook' s, brother' s, long history and heritage page on their website. Nowhere has it mentioned this little historical back star that they do say quote as the country' s oldest clothing retailer Brook' s brothers is powed to uphold the same traditions and values for nearly two centuries M. let' s hope not many well known American insurance providers and banks also cashed in on slavery and the slave trade. This is the story of a Red Bite and all the people around it like the people at the factory that made it like the driver of the truck that brought it to the owner of the store that sold it. They were all protected by Adma life and casualty, and so, as the factory itself, the trucker and the store Edna protects businesses in all kinds of ways and people in all kinds of ways and the things they own in all kinds of ways: Etna. Who is now a health insurance provider initially sold policies to slave owners to insure the lives of their slaves? When an enslaved person died, a slave owner collected the fiscal value of the person and then some the company issued a statement that was published in the Los Angeles Times in two thousand quote. Etna has long acknowledged that for several years shortly after its founding in eighteen, fifty three that the company may have insured the lives of slaves, we express our deep regret over any participation at all in this deplorable practice. And yet there' s no mention of this on Etna'...

...s website, predecessor, banks that formed the fortune. Five hundred companies, Bank of America, New York, life and J P Morgan also accepted enslaved people as collateral for loans and insured them as property at the time, and if a slave owner defaulted on alone, the banks would seize their slaves, then what would they do with them? I wonder in two thousand and one, the State of California passed legislation requiring insurance companies to hand over company records pertaining to policies insuring enslaved people prior to eighteen. Sixty five New York life provided documents showing their parent company Nautilus. Insurance Company had sold five hundred and eight policies ensuring the lives of enslaved people in the eighteen S, according to New York life' s website, they only sold these policies for a short time between eighteen, forty, six and eighteen, forty eight and it accounted for less than five per cent of their business. However, a New York Times article from two thousand and sixteen said the policies accounted for a third of total policies between eighteen, forty, five in eighteen, forty eight and the company paid the equivalent of two hundred and thirty two thousand dollars in claims before voting to discontinue the practice in eighteen. Forty eight after the city of Chicago passed an ordinance in two thousand and two requiring companies to disclose whether or not they or a predecessor had profited from the institution of slavery. Bank of America scramble to minimize damage to their public image. Company representatives testified in front of the Chicago City Council that, although the president of one of their predecessor, companies was in fact a slave trader, he in no way received funding for that Endeavour from the bank. What was a salary used for then Bank of America' s historical records reportedly show only two such policies that insured slaves were ever sold. Oddly enough, the link to the Bank of America report conducted by the Heritage Research Center, which detailed these findings, has been inactive on line for some time. J P Morgan, a major provider of investment, banking and financial services, though they actually owned slaves, lot of them in two thousand five. They admitted that between eighteen, thirty one and eighteen sixty one their two predecessor, banks accepted nearly thirteen thousand enslaved people as collateral when slave owners defaulted on these loans, the banks confiscated ended up owning over one thousand two hundred and fifty enslaved people. What was J P Morgan' s atonement for profiting from slavery? They pledged five million dollars to a Louisiana Scholarship Fund for African American students seems money can buy anything for those who have it, including rubber, stamped redemption. I' ll point out that most, if not all, of the revelations about these companies came as a result of either the Chicago City Ordinance or a rash of class action. Lawsuits filed in the early two thousands seeking reparations from these companies for their involvement and profit from the institution of slavery. To date, none of these companies have made direct reparations To communities or people of Color and in general. The discussion around reparations for Black Americans affected by slavery remains a divisive issue in American business and politics. If you listen to episode to of Four Racist History, the Racist History of American law enforcement you' ll know very little changed by way of attitudes towards people of Color in this country. After the end of the American Civil War and the abolition of slavery. How did this effect newly freed black people trying to start new lives and businesses spoiler alert? It hasn' t been pretty easy or seamless the southern economy after the civil war was completely destroyed. Reconstruction turned into a nightmare for southern whites and, of course, they took their frustrations out on blacks. While four million newly freed black people were searching for a new path for their lives, an entire population of destitute war, wearied and humiliated former confederates detested their new freedom for many freed men and women. At the time, a career in agriculture seemed a logical choice, but...

...getting a piece of the land they and their ancestors had toiled on proved to be much harder than anticipated. There were efforts to break up, abandoned and confiscated plantations into smaller lots for freed black farmers, northern abolitionists and local free blacks. Did this on Saint Helena, Island and port royal in South Carolina in eighteen, sixty three with relative success? Forty acres and a mule was another proposal devised under the Freedman' s bureau act of eighteen, sixty five to parcel and redistribute large southern plantations to help facilitate the rise of the independent black farmer, but it never came to fruition. Why once again, racism? The? U S, government found it difficult to square with The reality of redistributing land from white people to black people. A white supremacies Tome called the lost cause was then published in eighteen sixty six and it was an attempt to repaint the image of the old south. It spelled out in no uncertain terms he justification for the former confederate cause. I portrayed slavery as a necessary evil that protected and nurtured enslaved people, instead of the horrific reality that it was plantations altered their facades to embody. This message reforming their outward appearance to match to mythology for the new influx of northern patrons interested in indulging in southern nostalgia. Instead of images of brutality, cruelty and to humanization visitors to plantations were often met by well dressed black workers. Now, in quote, service rather than slavery, called anti and uncle to appear as though these former slaves were a welcome part of the family, even in two thousand twenty one plantation tours in the American south still sell whitewashed history to eager tourists and promote destination weddings on the grounds of old slave quarters. Racist Imagery has long been used to appeal to a white sense of nostalgia. Longing for quote the good old days of the American south was encapsulated by brands, using images of black slave stereotypes, American companies, cashed in on these stereotypes and large brand marketing campaigns, in addition to antemes adaptation of an old black southern mammy that appealed to the nostalgic white consumer. Looking for gentle reminders of a quote simpler time, Uncle Ben' s, instant rice and the cream of wheat, breakfast porridge brand mascots also emulated the so called gentle old house slave non threatening black man stereotype juxtaposed these seemingly docile figures against stereotypes of threatening freed black men as rapists and abusers of white women, as depicted in D, W Griffith' s famous film about the Ku Klux clan, the birth of a nation- and it' s no surprise, white people clung wholeheartedly to these feel. Good images they created for themselves. Fear it turns out, is a powerful tool. It' s almost as powerful as nostalgia and ambivalence. It whitewashed past treatment of the previously enslaved black people, particularly the efforts made following the civil war to prevent freed men from becoming financially independent after eighteen. Sixty five, the majority of newly freed slaves, didn' t have a set to their names. They were often left with no other option than to enter into labor agreements with the same white people would previously enslave them. This practice created a new system of tenant farming, referred to as shere cropping. Here' s the basic gist of how sharecropping or the more accurate term debt slavery worked. A plantation owner would agree to allow black and sometimes poor white farmers to live and work, an allotted acreage of their land to pay for rent equipment and other expenses. The farmer agreed to pay The plantation owner with a portion of his crop. They signed a contract. This effect which most freed blacks, couldn' t read because antebellum literacy laws made it a crime to teach enslave people to read or write until eighteen sixty five. What became the norm, however, is at the end of the harvest. Season Plantation Owners would produce a list of infractions finds or unforeseen costs. That meant the farmer essentially owed more money than their crop yielded. If in usually when this happened, there...

...was a clause in the contract that said Sher croppers automatically signed on for another year in the same broken record, play again and again and again for the black farmers. This was also a common conundrum for blacks and servant positions colloquially nicknamed servitude. Many formerly enslaved servants signed contracts that kept them in the same jobs and living in the same primitive shanties they inhabited during slavery. They would receive penalties for things like their dogs barking too loud on a Sunday morning or missing work because of illness and at the end of the year they would owe their quote employer money. It essentially turned into a system of financial enslavement. If you were indebted to them, the plantation owner owned you until you could pay them off and usually no one ever could. So. What about black people who tried to start their own businesses? In early America? It' s nearly impossible to start a business while living in poverty aspiring black entrepreneurs had trouble securing loans, in addition to outright refusal by some banks, to lend to any one who wasn' t white racist lending practices also meant hefty collateral and higher interest rates for black consumers. It often took formerly enslaved people and their children years if they were lucky to secure enough capital to start their own independent business ventures, but it did happen and by the turn of the twentieth century, black owned businesses were finding their footing. Madam C, J Walker born Sarah Breed love is often credited as becoming the United States. First, black female millionaire a child of slaves. She did it by creating a successful business for her line of black hair care, known as the Walker System in one and nine hundred a d o five at GAK. You don' t You You can' t o. Madam Walker learned her technique from the leading black hair care specialist at the time, Annie Malone, another black female entrepreneur who also became a millionaire. These black women found plenty of space for their personal products in the market, as almost all health and beauty products on the market at the time were marketed to white women, the entire mainstream beauty industry. In the early nineteen hundreds focused on Euro centric, I e white standards and department stores built their cosmetics departments to suit, because department stores wouldn' t feed at your cosmetics for black women. Madame waker resorted to dor to dore sales to market her products when she gained enough capital, she opened brick and mortar store fronts of her own that employed mostly women of color. The success of her stores, however, also made her a target, but Madame Walker didn' t let it stop her from speaking out on behalf of black women in business, she paid her success forward. She donated money back to the black community via the. why M CA, the Tuskegee Institute, Schools for Black Girls and women and various community church organizations at a convention for the National Negro Business League in Nineteen? Twelve Walker declared. I am a woman who came from the cotton fields of the south. From there I was promoted to the wash tub From there. I was promoted to the cook kitchen and from there I promoted myself into the business of manufacturing, hair goods and preparations. I have built my own factory on my own ground, Booker Tea, Washington founded the National Negro Business League in nineteen hundred with the intention of helping black men and women succeed in business, one third of a fabulation, the to an equal. I go in the prize. I borrow Welaen of our population. His organization was open to any one regardless of race, as long as they were in good standing within their community to day the National Negro Business League is known as the National Business League and continues to help black owned businesses in America. In the tradition of Booker t Washington, entrepreneur and author Fan, weaver started whisky brand uncle nearest in two thousand, seventeen to honour a...

...black man overlooked in our history books, and she has strived to use her success to help support other black owned businesses. A multi award winning enterprise run by an all female leadership team. Weavers company is named after Nathaniel eares green, a once enslaved black man who taught a young Jack Daniel how to make whiskey as the first master distiller of Jack Daniels, now famous Tennessee, whiskey, green perfected, the Lincoln County distilling process. This unique method of filtering whiskey through sugar, maple charcoal was first introduced in Tennessee by enslaved people like nearest greed. His legacy lives on not only is a brand name called uncle nearest whisky through his family of black entrepreneurs. Today is great great granddaughter Victoria, Ed Butler, his uncle nearest master blunder and the first black female master blender in recorded history. The company has created initiatives to encourage more people of color to enter the spirits in the tree and help other small black owned brands thrive in June, two thousand and twenty in partnership with Brown Foreman' s Jack Daniel distillery, uncle nearest unveiled plans for the nearest Green School of the stilling and Motlotlo Community College near by to Lahoma Tennessee. The two companies also launched an apprenticeship program to allow black distillers to shadow experts in the industry. Uncle nearest has also separately launched the black business booster program, which is dedicated to helping ten black owned spirits, companies with successful business strategies and capital. A quick note about the use of uncle here. It' s not comparable to the use of uncle in a brand like uncle Ben' s, because nearess family were involved with its founding naming and are still involved to this day he was not exploited by white marketers, who made him into a caricature of himself to make a buck earlier. Episodes of FFERS history primarily explored American racism and its impact on black and Jewish communities. But, as you probably already know- or you should, this podcast is here to help you. If you don' t. Native Americans have also experienced numerous atrocities and injustices at the hands of white settlers, the United States, government and capitalists. They have not been spared from racist, depictions or advertising in American culture native American portrayals in Western films, corporate advertising, anti littering public service announcements, and especially a sports team mask gots present indigenous peoples of the Americas. As a one dimensional worries, some people have a deep abiding respect for the natural beauty that was once his company. Some people don' t Petatin. Two Thousand and five, the American Psychological Association called for the immediate retirement of all American Indian mascots symbols, images and personalities by schools, colleges, universities, athletic teams and organizations. Their research shows. These images are particularly harmful in schools and college environments because they are centers of learning. They also claim the mascots are quote undermining the educational experiences of members of all communities, especially those who have had little or no contact with indigenous peoples. In essence, the incorrect and racist representation of an entire culture stimulates ignorance. Now imagine that happening thousands of times over the centuries and in our class rooms and on our television and film screens, opponents of native American mask out removal, say these images are meant to show respect to the communities as depictions of courage and resilience, but native Americans by and large disagree. One of the most recognizable examples in recent years is that of the National Football League team, the Washington redskins after years of community members and native American rights groups calling for the removal of their caricatured American, Indian Longa and demeaning team name owners. Finally, rebranded the organization...

...in the wake of nationwide protests following the murder of George Floyd and other young black men. The same happened when The Atlanta Braves and The Cleveland Indians, Major League Baseball teams, dropped the use of their racial ized logos and tea traditions. A as a chief- and you know what happened after they re branded and stopped promoting races, stereotypes, nothing. Some people addicted to nostalgia, complained, but the sky didn' t fall. The teams didn' t fold players when I' m playing team owners continued to make money and fans kept watching as if it didn' t really matter much if their favorite team once had a racist, mascot or not. This is also interesting, however, while the removal of racist imagery that promotes stereotypes is certainly a positive step for society, how quickly we were able to move on from it without truly addressing the harmon cause. Generations of people is not. Maybe there is a lesson in this redemption without accountability is just more white privilege. What about modern marketing practices? Aside from the aforementioned aunt Chamina cream of wheat and uncle Ben' s, there are more recent examples of covert racism and advertising than we can count play the clip. I was at the top of not Evans out in Denver Colorado, and I certainly felt the effects of my smoking addiction of being able to breathe, and it was apparent to me that I was more of the very few because most people weren' t smoking, including the R J Reynolds Executives, and I asked the R J reynolds executives why they weren' t smoking. I thought it quite odd and he turned to me and he said we reserved the right to smoke for the young, the poor, the black o stupid, that was Winston cigarettes. Advertising model Dave girlet talking about what he was told by a company executive from R J Reynolds one of the world' s largest tobacco companies, which includes brands like newport, camel pall, mall and Winston girlet later became an outspoken anti. Smoking advocate nose, throat and accessory organs, not that firstly affected by smoking. Chesterfields first such report ever published about any cigarettes, and it applies only to chesterfield for decades white advertising executives targeted black youth with menthol flavored cigarette advertisements, with some brands placing over seventy per cent of their marketing budgets towards that demographic ads of even included voicing support for America' s black history month, beginning in E S, white advertisers began placing black and Brown people in the forefront of cigarette ads a place. Most brands had typically reserved for white models. Visions of black musicians, athletes, business professionals and happy couples suddenly appeared front and centre with a mental cigarette in hand. I want you folks off there to dot that when just o an smokes, the cigarette he smokes Chestie. This aggressive advertising strategy by tobacco companies worked a two thousand, and sixteen study found that eighty five per cent of black smokers preferred smoking menthol compared to just twenty nine per cent of white smokers. smokers when your taste tells you it' s time for a can, come up, come up, make a real change. come up, come up, come on all the way up to the man, falacious groups of lobbied for a ban on Menthol and other flavored cigarettes and tobacco products, including the noble, a C P, the National Association for the Advancement of black people. Recently, the N. U A C P got their wish. The Food and Drug Administration announced in April of Two thousand twenty one that they were taking steps toward enacting the band in response and OUA CT. President and C E, O Deryck Johnson, said quote : It is long overdue to protect the health of African Americans and to reduce the deleterious impact of mental smoking and tobacco use overall on America' s health. Modern Company, supporting more blatant white supremacy with their advertising dollars is another big issue altogether. For example, television advertising slots on Fox newses Tucker Carlson to night, whose host regularly makes bigoted comments and seems to support outright white...

Su premisis views it as our civilization is superior, and we need to defend it. What' s wrong with saying that there are still lessons to draw from nine eleven ones that we shouldn' t forget. Not all cultures are the same. Not all cultures are equal to for Americans and nobody cares about them. It' s like shot up, you' re dying, we ' re going to replace you. Everybody gets a safe space except white men. They are hated and despised. The American Nazi part o The KAKK. Don' t really exist in a meaningful, so they may they have an officer, a website which supremacy is not ubiquitous in America. It' s not a crisis. Fox News has come out and said quote: Any reasonable viewer arises with an appropriate amount of skepticism about the statements. Tucker Carlson makes and quote essentially they' re saying the public should not believe one of their top hosts, but to keep tuning in. Despite the fact he makes racist statements. Advertisers continue to buy prime time slots which support Carlson' s air time and legitimizes bigoted remarks. Although recent outrages cause some brands to pull their advertising from the show, they are sometimes slowly lured back by its high ratings, as is so often the case in capitalism, profit margins, trump principles and common human decency. There are, however, people fighting back against this under the table: Support of white supremacies and extremist media sleeping giants. An activist organization was founded in two thousand and sixteen to call out companies that do just that support racism. They started a twitter page with the intention of holding companies accountable that chose to advertise with organizations like Bright Bart News, a far right media company that has been infecting conservative readers with Tucker Carlson. Ask Quote News since its inception in two thousand and seven sleeping giants believe that by applying social pressure, we, as in we as a society, can create real and lasting impact in eliminating practices by companies that support racism. It works too because of pressure from groups like sleeping giants. Bright Part lost over ninety percent of its advertising revenue during their push, and then there are the not so covert ways that advertisers directly and indirectly or perhaps even inadvertently- support the notion of white supremacy. For example, dove a large consumer soap brand released a television commercial in two thousand and seventeen that, in its opening few frames, depicted a black woman lifting up her shirt to reveal a white woman beneath it. While a bottle of dove' s body wash was visible. This was reminiscent of old soap ads that attempted to demonstrate that soap worked so well, I quote, turns Black White. This cringe worthy tag line is from a cook' s lightning, so bad from on thou, nine hundred five, the dove commercial, was pulled after Hash Tag. Boycott dove started trending on twitter. The company' s response quote an image we recently posted missed The mark in representing women of color thoughtfully. We deeply regret the offence it caused and quote, but what about the harm it caused? We regret our company ' s involvement in this deplorable practice. We deeply apologize for contributing to the hurt of the African American community. Our Company is deeply committed to fighting for racial justice, we' re doing our best to educate ourselves and learn. The IM. Saris are profuse nowadays and coming from seemingly every corner of American industry. George Floyd' s globally, publicized murder in two thousand and twenty forever changed the social landscape. It did something to the public consciousness. Average people felt empowered to say this is wrong. Racism is systemic and the perpetrators must be held accountable. Companies that resisted change for years suddenly did a one hundred and eighty degree turn they asked for forgiveness, release statements and promise their support for communities of Color Bank of America pledged one billion dollars to companies working towards social justice. New York life has loudly touted their efforts to right past wrongs by sponsoring two P B: s documentarieson slavery and the effects of Jim...

Crow. As well as being a founding donor to the MYSONIUS National Museum of African American History and culture, Bank of America pledged five million dollars over three years to institutions and programs involved in the preservation of African American history. Well, it' s easy to applaud these companies for these declarations and donations, real and lasting change as yet to be seen. More importantly, they have not addressed the generations of trauma the cause to Blacken Brown Americans because of their past practices. There' s actually a larger issue at play here that no amount of apologies or donations to scholarship funds can fix. There are so many American companies who have profited from systemic racism and continue to do so. The entire economic system of The United States was founded to protect the financial interests of white men by dehumanizing, every one who was not a white man. We ' ve changed our laws, made progress in reforms and yet problems like predatory lending and housing discrimination, racist marketing tactics and generational. Racial wealth gap still plague this nation. Many of the companies that for centuries profited from things like racism, slavery and the Dehumanization of Americans seemed to now simply be paying lip service to protect their prophet margins in the long term for company shareholders. While there have been companies who have genuinely pivoted from supporting racism in the past to countering it, namely foundations like those started by Ford and Calogero like aunt, Jemima, uncle Ben and Etna Hope. A simple apology will make their past racist activities go away or that a rebrand might conceal them. That' s exactly what corrections corporation of America or C C, a one of the oldest and largest for prophet private prison companies in the country did in two thousand and sixteen after getting a sleugh of bad press. In two thousand and ten, the American Civil Liberties Union filed the lawsuit claiming that low staffing levels at one of C CA' s correctional facilities in ido led to high levels of violence among inmates, an F B. I investigation, followed and found that the company had been falsifying their staffing records. Then, in two thousand, a D fifteen mother Jones, reporter Shane Bower, went under cover as a prison guard for four months in one of C C A' s prisons in Louisiana and wrote a scathing expose in two thousand and sixteen about his experience and observations. Following bowers report and after the Justice Department sent out a memo indicating in one of the phase out private prisons, C ca simply changed their name to Corsive and coined a happy new slogan quote better the public good. Yet CORSI IC is still in the business of making profit from incarcerating a disproportionate number of black and Brown people, and they contract with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement to detain immigrants at our nation' s southern border, such as at the T, Don Hutto detention center in Texas. This facility has a long troubled history under corsives ownership. It now holds women seeking asylum during their emigration proceedings. In a March, two thousand twenty one report by grass roots leadership and the Texas Law Immigration Clinic revealed that Corsi IC delivers poor service and subjects to detain women to unacceptable conditions, ranging from a lack of adequate food and medical care to sexual abuse, to force Labor. So much for civility and the public good companies like MC Donald' s, Wendy' s victorious secret sprint and American Airlines all benefit from the four Prophet prison system as well. They rely on cheap prison labor, so they can stamp a made in America label on their products without paying inmates federal minimum wage. This just perpetuates slavery by another name and bolsters the prison industrial. Complex Amazon. An I B M have helped keep those prisons full by providing artificial intelligence, facial recognition, technology to police, which is led to false identification of suspects and the wrongful imprisonment of people of Color. Recently, both companies bowed to social pressure. Amazon placed...

...a moratorium on police use of this technology, and I B M pledged to stop develop in e facial recognition technology altogether and announced the one hundred million dollar technology asset donation to historically black colleges and universities smiling happy and Gemima fame for her secret Ratie pancakes one thousand buck week. What' s your happy thought for to day well Metelin, but you can earn it? Yes, a your and I guess we all want to be happy. Let' s take a final look at the case of an Chamina after quaker oates announced their decision to retire the brand name in June two thousand and twenty they removed the face of the jovial black woman from their packaging, which had previously been used to replace the face of a jovial black mammy in February two thousand twenty one. They revealed their new name or their original name Pearl Milling Company. How nostalgic they also updated their website before the branding change. Aunt Jemima' s website had a fairly extensive time line that included Nancy Green, the former enslaved women who inspired the Anchemolus t n t osait hundred and ninety three Chicago world' s fair. Now their history has been scrubbed clean, then he and all mention of the woman who helped bill. The famous brand PepsiCo quaker OATES' s parent company did, however, pledge one million dollars to empower and uplift black girls and women. The initiative is part of a five year investment of more than four hundred million dollars to uplift black business and communities and increase black representation at Pepsico. Most of the companies we' ve talked about in this episode also don' t include their historic connections to slavery and racism on their company history pages and companies that are forced to admit it like J P, Morgan, simply hemmed and hot about it, drop the press, release and then buried it. How are these companies addressing their past as they move forward beyond just giving out donations? Certainly from the recent testimony of company executives to the US Congress, it appears not by changing their practices much in the future. Kindly let the record reflect that. the panel is made up of white men, you' ve all sermonized, to a certain extent, about diversity. If you believe that your likely successor will be a woman or a person of color, would you kindly extend a hand into the air that the record reflect all white men and none of you not one appears to believe that your successor will be a female or a person of color. Modern companies working toward authentic change do exist, but they are few and far between, although the pressure is mounting for more companies to do better, in addition to the important work of sleeping giants, the non profit, civil rights advocacy organization, color of change, has multiple ongoing campaigns to affect social change. They worked a defunt white supremist organizations. They even have an ongoing campaign demanding reparations from J P Morgan Bank for profiting from slavery. Then there are companies without problematic histories who are intentionally taking a stand for racial and social justice causes like Ben and Jerry' s ice cream company. They started a foundation that actively works towards dismantling oppressive systems and use seventy five per cent of their profits to support grand programs and small grass roots movements. If you' re curious about who they ' ve given money to their website lists them all, they have fifty four pages of organizations listed from just two thousand and twenty alone. If one thing is become abundantly clear, it' s that people us have the power to force change for the better most long running companies and government institutions don' t change on their own until we make them change the first step. We educate ourselves on the reality of our unjust past and don' t let it be swept under the rug. Forgotten are repeated. That' s all for today join me next time, as we shine a light on another shameful chapter of our country' s racist path. We can' t beat the problem if We can' t see it. You' ve been listening to F your...

...racist history. If you like what you' ve heard, do us a favor and rate us on whichever platform you listening, it helps you can get more information on this and other episodes at Fur. Racist History, com for on your favorite podcast gap, fur racist History is produced by gold, no group and distributed by sounder. This episode was researched, fact, checked and written by Maggie coome and Jasmine brand links to source material and references who included in the show notes. Our editor is Ken Pendola Music is courtesy of flat fit fifty six Jamie Moler is our producer and I' m the executive producer, your host Christian Peachie. Thank you for joining, see you next time and is always F Your Racist History.

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