F*** Your Racist History
F*** Your Racist History

Episode 102 · 10 months ago

The Racist History of American Law Enforcement

ABOUT THIS EPISODE

We live in troubled times. After numerous killings of unarmed people of color by police over the past decade and beyond, the relationship between the public and law enforcement seems to be on the brink of exploding. On one side of the debate, activists claim a systemic racism problem. On the other, supporters of law enforcement claim these horrific acts of force are either necessary or the actions of a few “bad apples.” In 1963, President John F. Kennedy declared the week of May 15th National Police Week and said, “from the beginning of this Nation, law enforcement officers have played an important role in safeguarding the rights and freedoms which are guaranteed by the Constitution and in protecting the lives and property of our citizens.” But, this couldn’t be further from the truth. Join me as we look into the racist origin story of America’s laws and the people who enforce them.

...*** Note: This transcription service has errors. Correct versions of the script for each episode are available At https:// www. fyourracisthistory. com/ scripts. At the heart of America is a dirty and shameful reality. Every one knows it exists, but the devastating impact that is left on generations of people has been glossed over and even ignore, especially by those who still benefit from it. Our American history is rooted in racism. More obvious chapters include the decimation of native American populations, slavery, segregation and the Jim Prote. Most Americans have learned about, or at least heard of these events, but ask them about the ingenius movement or when home grown extremists filled Madison Square Garden or Nazi ran for how Henry Ford' s hatred of Jews helped Inspire Adolph Hitler and you' re likely to get a plank stair it' s time to explore these overlooked events that don' t make it into our history book and correct. The record for the people harmed by them to trace are passed to modern tragedies and learn how folks, over the centuries, have fought back. We need to confront our racist history so that we might have a chance to defeat it once and full and Christian Peachey, the former white supremacies, who became an anti racist activist and a bringer of hard truth on each episode of that. Your Racist History, you learn about America' s conveniently overlooked racist origin stories join in as we yank off the hood and expose the lines behind some of America, so called triumphs and heroes warning. This episode contains scenes that depict violence and death you' ll, probably also get really pissed off, or there waterful. I can' t breathe. George Floyd said it twenty six times before taking his last breath all while a white police officer knelt on his neck killing him. The relationship between American law enforcement and people of Colour is a deep festering wound, and if we trace our nations policing back to its earliest roots, you can see how poisonous it truly is. Since the two thousand and twenty murder of George Floyd by former Minneapolis police officer, Derek Chauvin, I can' t breathe, has become a global rallying cry for those who support anti racism and the fight for civil rights and equal justice. This tragic incident, one of arguably thousands like it around the country which ultimately found Chauvin guilty of murder, forced a national debate on methods of policing that have long gone unchecked and unpunished, and it brought global attention to the harassment abuse in harm. Black and Brown people have endured at the hands of police throughout American history. I can' t breathe, was initially adopted as a protest call after a New York City, police officer killed another black man named Eric Garner in two thousand a D fourteen former officer Daniel Pantaleo, held forty three year old gardener in a Cho cold on the ground, while initiating an arrest on suspicion of him illegally selling loose cigarettes, a misdemeanor violation, he told police, I can' t breathe eleven times before losing consciousness and never waking up. No charges were ever brought against Pantaleo for Gardner' s death and it took over five years for the N Y P D. determinate his employment, two days after Pantaleo Firing Sergeant kised annus, who had arrived on...

...the scene as officers pressed Garner to the ground and had been charged with multiple counts of failure to supervise made a deal to forfeit just twenty vacation days to keep her job. This means only two of the dozen or so officers involved in Eric Garner' s arrest and his death effaced any penalty. Another case that sparked outrage and galvanized many into action was the killing of Travann Martin, the black lives matter, movement which protests incidents of police brutality and racially motivated violence was formed in two thousand and thirteen after Travann' s killer. George Zimmerman was acquitted, though not a police officer, but instead a civilian coordinator of an unofficial, Neighborhood Watch Zimmerman fatally shot the unarmed seventeen year old, Martin in two thousand twelve and claim self defense under Florida stand your ground law, which provides that people can use deadly force when they reasonably believe it' s necessary to defend themselves against deadly force. Martin' s only aggression that fateful night was that he was black and walking alone to day black lives matter. Activists seek to eradicate white supremacy and build local power to intervene in violence inflicted on black communities. It' s a movement to respond to, and work to change the harsh realities that communities of color face. They should light on injustices as well as things like the talk, the difficult but necessary conversation. Black and brown parents have, with their young children, about what to do and what not to do when interacting with the police, because their life could depend on it. Dear Child, dear Child, do try. The reason we have to have this talk is because you are a black child in America, hands up in the air or on a steering wheel where officers can see them at all times. No sudden movements ask for permission to reach for something and clearly explain what you' re doing when you move be respectful comply. I children of color must memorize this code of conduct and carry it with them throughout their lives, because his countless injuries and deaths at the hands of police and vigilantes have proven, though sworn to serve and protect, can' t always be relied on to serve and protect them. It down and as many cases of police brutality have shown us even following the instructions of the talk, will not always guarantee safety or life by speaking truth to power. Black lives matter has been met with much criticism and resistance. After all, for every legitimate action there' s an equal and opposite reaction, blue lives matter and in front to black lives matter which blue lives matter denies was formed in December, two thousand fourteen following the murder of two New York City Police Officers, officers, Rafael Ramos and when Jan Lou were shot and killed, while sitting in their patrol car in Brooklyn, the perpetrator of Dola Brinsley, a black man posted on instar that the murders were revenge for the police, slayings of unarmed black men. Even though ambush killings of police had actually declined more than ninety per cent. Since Nineteen Seventy Lu, live' s matter supporters...

...rallied, as did white supremacies, who saw it as an opportunity to radicalized Jad in white cops. Some US states even began passing laws to categorize physical attacks on law enforcement officers as hate crimes. Meanwhile, states like South Carolina, Arkansas and Wyoming still don' t have hate crime laws for bias against citizens M. Given the timing of blue lives, matters, establishment and their coating of the acronym B L M, its actual purposes in opposition group to black lives matter appears thinly. Veiled. Blue Lives matter seems hell bent on preserving the policing status quo, meaning upholding long standing, dehumanizing and white supremist practices and law enforcement. Their insignia is a black and gray variation of the American flag, with a distinctive, Thin Blue Line in the middle. A reference to the belief that police are the only protection between society and outright chaos. In an ironic twist, pro police insurrectionists at the January sixth attack on the capital actually beat capital police with blue lives matter flat has them happens. Then there are the oath keepers formed in two thousand, a d nine. This right wing anti government paramilitary group believes a new world order, led by the quote. Liberal elite is threatening to destroy America' s constitutional republic. They, like blue lives matter sympathizers and white nationalists, falsely claim black lives matter. IS AN ANTI white MARXIST TERROR ORGANIZATION SET OUT TO DESTROY AMERICAN VALUES? I White AMERICAN values. What makes this extremist militia particularly dangerous is that they focus their recruitment efforts primarily on current and former law enforcement officers, military servicemen and Women First Respondes, the oath keeper' s main pretext is claiming to uphold their oath to protect the: U S: Constitution from all enemies, foreign and domestic, even if it means disobeying direct orders from superior officers are marginalized. Other Americans in the process they infamously, showed up in Fergus in Missouri, in support of law enforcement after police shot and killed. A young black man named Michael Brown in two thousand fourteen, several oath keepers, leaders and members, along with blue lives matter. Supporters have also been charged in connection with the January sixth attack on the US capital building and capital police earlier this year, alongside them in their siege, a host of white supremacies, Yo, Nazis and conspiracy. Theorists black lives matter, and many civil rights activists argue that police violence against people of color is a systemic problem. Hundreds of years old, in other words the roots of this tree, are rotten. On the other hand, blue lives matter claims that cases like those of Eric Garner and George Floyd resulted from outliers and rogue officers. A few bad apples, while conveniently ignoring the full proverb that one bad apple spoils the whole barrel. They say our law enforcement system is inherently good, that its law enforcement officers, who need protection from violent criminals and if our prison population is any indication of who law enforcement and our justice system consistently in historically perceive as violent criminals. Its people of Color, who is right, is the...

...problem with individual bad cops or is it that the entire system they are trained in and come from, is rooted in white supremacy and will inevitably produce rotten fruit? How did we arrive at this moment in time to understand the origin of American law enforcement? We first have to understand the origin story of our American laws. For that we have to go way back to before the formation of the United States. We have to get colonial. This is episode too. That' s your racist history. The racist history of American law enforcement, British colonization of the Americas began in sixteen o seven with the formation of the first colony at Jamestown Virginia by the early seventeen hundreds, the British, had successfully dominated the North American continent and established thirteen colonies back then, colonial America' s entire legal policing system was adapted from English law, no surprise there. Since America was still a collection of English colonies. At the time urban centers had different needs than rural communities, as did the northern colonies in southern colonies. The northern colonies, whose economies were based mainly around shipping and mercantilism an urban cities throughout the original thirteen colonies, quickly learned to rely on what they called constables and night watchmen to control any disorder that might impede their new profit. Centers. The city of Boston is a clear example of The evolution of northern urban policing. Sixteen thirty one, the then town of Boston, formed the Boston Watch. These civilian watchmen were responsible for patrolling the streets, looking for murderers thieves and any fires that might break out a common occurrence of the time. The position of watchman was not a coveted position for Bostonians. It was often dulled out as punishment. More often than not, watchmen spent their duty hours drunk and rowdy. On the other hand, constables which were officially sanctioned law enforcement officers, dispensed justice, settled legal disputes among merchants and had other random civic duties like surveying land per doctor, Gary Potter, an Eastern Kentucky University criminologist constables quote, were expected to control a dangerous under class that included African Americans immigrants and the poor in more rural communities. Colonials instituted variations of something called the Frank Pledge System, a framework of communal policing, with origins dating back to eleventh century England. In these instances, community members were responsible for policing each other with one mo enforcement official overseeing the operation. The sheriff sheriffs were initially appointed by colonial governors and eventually became associated with corruption and greed of the late seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries. It wasn' t uncommon for sheriff, appoint es to outright refuse the unsavoury positions to combat this trend. Colonial governors instead instituted local elections to select the sheriff a custom that remains to this day. This borrowed system of policing became a staple in small rural communities in the American south, but it was actually the British colony of Barbados that had the most significant influence over law enforcement in that region, specifically the barbadian policies of policing and legal restrictions of enslaved peoples. Slavery arrived...

...in North America in sixteen nineteen and was a staple in the British colony at Barbados by the mid. Sixteen hundreds by Sixteen sixty one Barbados enacted the first official slave cove slave codes were a collection of laws to restrict the movements and liberties of enslaved African people. More specifically, it established a long standing but false ethos of white superiority over people of color. The following is a passage from The sixteen sixty one barbadian code. Negroes are a heathenish brutish and an uncertain dangerous kind of people. Yet we well know by the right rule of reason and order. we are not to leave them to the arbitrary, cruel and outrageous wills of every evil disposed person, but so far to protect them, as we do many other goods and chattels. In other words, black people were considered savage and uncultured property and white people claim they were protecting them from their own savagery by ENSLAVING THEM HM as Bradley J Nicholson Explains in the American Journal of Legal History. English society was based on a top down hierarchical system. Any person, without a quote master, threatened the natural order and security of the ruling classes, ruling classes, otherwise known as white people. As the British continued to colonize the North American continent, code of laws to govern dominance over servants and slaves began to take shape in the image of Barbados Law. Restricting the movement of slaves became a crucial component in colonial. Southern Law, in almost all of the Southern colonies, use some iteration of the Barbadian slave code to enforce these racist laws. Communities raised malicious style groups known as slave patrols. In many cases the first instance of organized law enforcement agencies in a region, South Carolina established the first slave patrol in seventeen o four from seventeen twelve seventeen, forty, their state law even required the torture of slaves who had escaped in seventeen twenty four Virginia militarized, their slave patrols. By transferring the responsibility to enforce laws from regular civilians to the state militia and in seventeen fifty four the government began paying slave patrols directly for their service. According to Criminal Justice Historian, Dr Gary Potter quote: Slave Patrols had three primary functions: one to chase down, apprehend and return to their owners, runaway slaves, two to provide a form of organized terror, to deter slave revolts and three to maintain a form of discipline for slave workers, who were subject to summary Justice outside the law if they violated any plantation following the American revolution of seventeen. Seventy six, the thirteen original English colonies unified under the federal government federal power, was weak states, maintained autonomy over their laws and systems of enforcement. The new state laws were again just adaptations of former racist colonial laws by the seventeen hes and seventeen S. fear of slave revolts in the south prompted a further militarization of lanforre slave patrols. County courts authorized and...

...organize these patrols effectively, making policing slavery of Public Safety Initiative. They consisted of white men from every social class and socioeconomic circumstance, united it in the common cause of defending themselves and their families from so called black violence. The constant fear mongering of rebellion and economic disruption fostered a sense of solidarity among whites, who seemed to have a new common enemy to replace the British, the black slave in eighteen, thirty one, the unwarranted fear of blacks in America, seemed to become a reality for the white plantation class in Southampton County Virginia when an enslaved black preacher named Nat Turner, let a midnight revolt against the slave holding population in the area. Turner' s interpretation of the Bible told them that God did not intend for people to live the way he and other enslaved people were forced to live. He claimed God had sent him a message and the only way forward for his people was to meet violence with violence and estimated fifty white people were killed. The fore, Nat Turner' s rebellion was put down. Most of the enslaved participants were then captured, be killed and retaliation. The state executed, fifty six participants groot that Turner before it was over local white militia groups had murdered an additional one hundred to one hundred and fifty black people freed and enslaved. Even though most had no involvement in the revolt, Nat Turner' s rebellion soon became the main white argument for the unjust extreme measures being implemented to control enslaved populations in the southern slave states. In addition, the state sanction slave patrols, American slave owners also employed private entities like slave catchers to hunt down escaped enslaved to people, while slave catchers are often portrayed as the bogy man of the old south. The National Law Enforcement Museum in Washington D C points out quote: slave patrols were no less violent, as opposed to their privately hired slave catcher counterparts and their control of African Americans. They beat and terrorized as well. Their distinction was that they were legally compelled to do so by local authorities. Estates and city populations grew throughout the United States. More centralized police forces began to take hold in eighteen. Thirty, eight, the city of Boston, established the first municipal police department with six full time officers. American cities, like New York, Philadelphia and Washington D C soon followed suit per historian doctor Gary Potter quote early American police departments shared two primary characteristics. They were notoriously corrupt and flagrantly brutal. This should come as no surprise and that police were under the control of local politicians seems that much has changed in that regard. Either these new urban police forces grew exponentially over the next few decades by the early eighteen S, every major. U S: City had a municipal police department as slavery'...

...s economic profitability became increasingly apparent in the eighteen s es, and is the growing number of enslaved people in the south continue to bolster fear of slave rebellions, an economic disruption among whites in response to the growing slavery, abolition, movement in the north, policing of free black communities and the movement of enslaved people became even more restrictive and maniacal past in September of eighteen. Fifty is part of the compromise of eighteen. Fifty the fugitive slave act was a vital piece of legislation that forced northern law enforcement into the business of policing runaway slaves, whereas before once and enslaved, or Orson made it to a northern state, slave act now made it a federal crime to aid a quote fugitive slave. a person could be find up to one thousand dollars and jailed for refusing to assist in the capture of fugitives. Southern plantation owners now had the reach of the long arm of the law from Louisiana to the Canadian border, to police enslaved people for free people of Color. This signaled a devastating shift in the federal government' s position on the issue of slavery and racism. Now northern law enforcement agencies were actively employed in the surveillance and policing of black people, even if they had escaped enslavement. One thing to remember here and something pertinent to people' s attitudes in the north then, and now too, I suppose racism against black people was also pervasive throughout the northern states. As author Andrew Del Banco points out in an interview with N P R' s Terry Gross in two thousand and eighteen, some northerners were only in the abolitionist camp because they hated black people and didn' t want them showing up in their neighborhoods or stealing their jobs. in essence, they wanted slavery to end so that black people could be shipped out of the country either back to Africa or to Santo Domingo in the Caribbean. Of course, there were some whites in the north who opposed slavery on moral grounds, but it' s important to remember that, just because someone was an abolitionist working against slavery, it did not necessarily make them a proponent of equal rights, another devastating blow to black civil rights during the antebellum era. the period just before the American civil war was the dread Scott decision of eighteen, fifty seven dread. Scott was an enslaved black man, whose owners had taken him from Missouri, a slaveholding state into Illinois and the Wisconsin territory, where slavery was illegal, when his owners later brought him back to Missouri Scott sued for his freedom and claimed that, because he had been taken into free, U S, territory, he had become legally freed and was no longer a slave. The Missouri State Court initially ruled that he was free, but The Missouri Supreme Court then reversed that decision later, the Federal Court upheld the Missouri precedent leading Scott to appeal to the : U S Supreme Court, which issued a seventy two decision against him, considered one of the dirtiest Supreme Court decisions ever made. It essentially stripped all persons of African descent of their right to U S citizenship, regardless of whether they were considered enslaved or free. The decision once again reduced The legal status of black people to ownable property via the highest court in the land. Our entire American legal system is based on precedent, and this is the racist precedent.

Our leaders were working with on the eve of war, the dread Scott decision, exacerbated the tensions that eventually led to the eruption of America, civil war, the civil war started in April eighteen, sixty one and after four years and over six hundred thousand deaths, slavery finally ended and everything changed, or did it too often in our school textbooks in American history classes were sold this fable that the civil war was a war fought amongst brothers. It was a war about pride that it ended with the honorable surrender of the South and General Robert Lee. The demise of slavery, essentially The dawn of a new era of equality and our nation came out stronger on the other side, racism in America was legally over. That simply isn' t the truth. What really happened is the complete economic devastation of the southern United States, for which southern whites blamed, formerly enslaved black people and abolitionists the pot calling the kettle the inward. What else is new for every new law passed a bolster equality for black people during the reconstruction era? After the civil war, there was a loophole enacted for racist to exploit when it became clear in late eighteen, sixty four that the south was going to lose. The civil war white southerners began to reckon with The realization that slavery would also end. Congress was busy drafting the thirteenth amendment, which would effectively end Chattel slavery in the United States. If that happened, I would wit to keep black people in their place. to any semblance of white law and order they needed to figure out a legal solution quickly. Take the editor of the Lynchburg Virginian at the time quote. Stringent police regulations may be necessary to keep freed men from over, burdening the towns and depleting the agricultural regions of labor. the civil authorities should also be fully empowered to protect a community from this new imposition. The magistrates and municipal officers everywhere should be permitted to hold a rod and terror over these wandering idle creatures. Nothing short of the most efficient police system will prevent strolling vagrancy theft and the utter destruction of our industrial system. The Thirteenth Amendment did not guarantee civil rights or in sure equality, however, plantations ravaged by the war took advantage of a loophole in the new amendment. Slavery could still exist, quote as a punishment for crime whereof. The Party shall have been duly convicted and quote seemingly overnight. Southern plantations reopened as four prophet prisons. Their target newly freed people of color savages, as they called them, supported by a range of new racist laws. These new prisons started filling with, formerly enslaved people, a slew of new vagrancy laws cropped up throughout the country. This dramatically limited the movement of free blacks. If they went to a new city and started pounding the pavement looking for a job, they could easily be arrested as an unemployed. Vagrant loitering on the streets of black prisoners would be auctioned off to the highest white bidder to work off their sentence, starting in in eighteen.

Sixty five black codes were also enacted to further restrict the movements of the newly freed black codes were legal iterations of the former slave codes. Mississippi and South Carolina were the first states to enact them, and other states quickly followed suit. Many states black codes included additional taxes, rules about where black people could live, what jobs they could legally hold where they could be and when and other arbitrary laws intended to make life generally difficult for them. Many of these racist laws remained intact in one form or another. Until the civil rights movement of the N S, I in Tseih hundred and sixty five Mississippi passed. The law mandating. The black population show proof of employment each year if they broke their employment contract, which many could not read to begin with, it would be subject to fines and rest that same year, South Carolina passed a law that required black people to pay an additional tax of ten dollars to one hundred dollars to actually hold any job. That was not a servant or a farmer. In other words, they were taxed and tried for simply being black federal troops were stationed in the south to keep the peace during the turbulent reconstruction period, which followed the civil war, but their efforts to stem discrimination and timid ation of newly freed black people were futile, or perhaps they really didn' t try hard enough by eighteen. Sixty six, the Ku Klux clan had formed with one of the confederacies most famous generals at the helm, Nathan, Bedford Forest. The K K K picked up where The slave patrols left off. They used extra legal violence to restrict the movements of African Americans, prevented voting and intimidated black people from running for public office. Again, not much has changed in this regard, except maybe the sheets, the vigilanti terror of the K, K, K eventually gave way to white community led violence towards black people. In the Eighteen S, with the rise of Public Lynchings, whole towns participated in the murders and torture of black people and even sold souvenirs like commemoration, postcards and remnants of the victim' s teeth. According to the N. U A C P the National Association for the Advancement of black people between eighteen. Eighty, two nineteen sixty eight there were three thousand four hundred and forty six lynchings of black victims. Where was law enforcement during these extra judicial vigilanti killings? More often than not, police offered no resistance or actively protected the perpetrators. In some cases they themselves were perpetrators of the violence and killings, state sanctioned and vigilanti violence. Against Black people continued for decades, the turbulent nineteen sixty saw the violent suppression of Civil Rights Protests in response to growing public criticism over police brutality, most major police departments unionized in the s an ironic twist since police were used as a tool to suppress unionization in the eighteen S, S in early nineteen, hundreds police, unionization, reinforced the US verses them mentality, creating an even more insulated community for law enforcement. It made protecting in serving the communities they policed secondary to the...

...job title of Cop and it provided a buffer for their brutality. Before the ink on a Civil Rights Act o o hand. Nine hundred and sixty four was dry. A new enemy emerged drugs, America' s public enemy number one in the United States, is drug abuse. In order to fight and defeat this enemy, it is necessary to wage a new all out offensive in a press conference in June on Adne teen. Seventy one president Richard Nixon declared drugs, public enemy number one and in E S, President Ronald Reagan declared a literal war on drugs which led to today' s full scale, militarization of police and the current prison industrial complex. Who did this mandate primarily affect people of Colour and liberal activists? Laugh? My President of the United States said nothing you, young kids would do would have any effect on him, but I suggested the present in the United States. If you want to know how much affect you younkers can have on the president, he should make on diffrent to the B D red and a t B. I r a u a former nick and a John Erlich said in a two thousand and four interview quote. We knew We couldn' t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroine and then criminalising both heavily. We could disrupt both communities. We could arrest their leaders raid, their homes break up their meetings and vilify them night after night. On the evening news did. We know We were lying about the drugs. Of course We did and quote. Of course they did. President Bill Clinton then passed the crime Bill in E S, that assigned mandatory minimums to drug offenses and enacted the ten thirty three program or Lesso law enforcement support offices. This new program allowed the transfer of surplus military equipment to local police departments to fight crime to day the United States has only five percent of the world' s population, but twenty five percent of the world' s prison population we' re living in an era of mass incarceration and militant policing, not much as changed since the slave patrols of the seventeen hundreds. It is now abundantly clear that all of this disproportionately affects communities of color. On average, black people are incarcerated at a rate of five to one, over wit in some states. That number doubles to tend to one in two thousand and twenty thirty. Two per cent of the US population was composed of African Americans and Latin ex people compared to those same groups making of fifty six percent of the US incarcerated population. It' s illogically disproportionate until you factor in racism and law enforcement as a key ingredient. Still, this doesn' t even begin to factor in the devastating impact of actual infiltration of modern American law enforcement by Card carrying whites, so premisis, the F B I reported in two thousand and six that there were known white supremacies inside law enforcement agencies and further infiltration was an active threat. This is an important contemporary issue. Will cover more in depth and episodes to come. The purpose of our modern justice system doesn' t seem to be to de escalate violence protect and serve or rehabilitate its purposeis to arrest as many undesirable people as possible using...

...the most destructive weapons and dehumanizing means available and send offenders mostly black and Brown folks away for as long as possible. Isn' t that just modern slavery by another name? It' s not that good law enforcement officers don' t exist. They absolutely do, but too often the good ones are run out of policing when they go against the system, either by the police departments, where they leave of their own volition, because they get too fed up. In two thousand six: For example, Carriol Horn, a former Buffalo New York police officer, intervened when a white officer attempted to choke a black suspect, but was later fired for doing so mere months before she was eligible to receive her full pension. Only recently did the New York State Supreme Court rule that our pension be reinstated in two thousand eleven former Baltimore Police Detective Joseph Cristel reported the beating of a drug suspect by a fellow officer and his testimony helped secure convictions against that officer and the sergeant who helped facilitate the beating harassment and abuse from his colleagues followed and led Cristel to resign from his job. There are many more instances of cops who are focused on honoring their oath and truly serving their community, such as capital, police officer, Eugene, Goodman O put his life on the line to steer angry crowds away from law makers during the January sixth attack on the capital. But this mind set of inequity, dehumanization and white supremacy is systemic and generational within law enforcement culture. It ' s the fundamental basis for why policing systems exist in America. It is quite a remarkable sight, especially when you see those at officers they have the helmet. I they have the large e. They have the clubs summer, where a gas mask out of that as necessary that ar even officers who showed support for black lives matter protests by taking a knee or sitting with the crowds of protesters in the summer of two thousand, a d twenty later fired rubber bullets and tear gas at them state of Minnesota County of Headin District Court. Fourth, judicial district state of Minnesota, plaintiff versus Derek Michael Shovin defendant, bury to Count One court file number twenty seven CR, two zero One, two six, four six: we the jury in the above entitled matter as to Count One an intentional second agree: Murder, while committing a felony buying the defendant guilty as verdict. Although some rare accountability was seen in the murder of George Floyd, we are still far from justice in just a twenty four hours after former police officer. DERYCK SHAVIN' s guilty conviction for killing George Floyd in Minneapolis. in Two thousand twenty six additional people were killed by police, while Chauvin' s conviction matters. We must remember that an officer being suspended, fired, prosecuted or convicted is the rare exception, not the general rule. Video evidence, reliable witnesses, numerous previous complaints and testimony from fellow officers and medical experts are only some of the things that had to perfectly line up for this conviction to occur. Video evidence is often the catalyst for any form of accountability, something that only recently became a factor without it. Victims are rarely given any wide spread attention, especially from the media. Black lives matter. Activists around the country, along with advocacy organizations like the Leadership Council for civil and Human Rights Campaign, Zero Dream Defenders lack youth project, one...

...hundred the N L, a C P legal defense and Educational Fund, the Advancement Project showing up for racial justice, race forward, color of change, equal justice initiative, mothers against police brutality and numerous others are working to change the conversation around race and to stop violence and police brutality and marginalized communities. They' ve been instrumental in achieving some hard fought victories, but much remains to be done and they need our help. Their names alone now symbolized the issue: George Floyd Eric Garner Michael Brown, to mere rice, Briana, Taylor, Sandra Bland, a drag me out get out of the Corolla you a no bosom gen, Freddie, grey, Filanda, Castile, Le Quan, Mc Donald Walter Scan, Adam Toledo, and so many more black and Brown people dying at the hands of police common tragedy in America. That now sparks protests raises serious questions about how police do and should interact with black and brown citizens. So where do we begin? Let me pose a series of what, if what, if police were required to live in the communities they policed? How might that change their approach? What if we re, allocated some resources and directed certain responsibilities away from police and invested in mental health, service providers, social workers, religious leaders, educators and victim advocates? What if we helped people meet their basic needs, so some wouldn' t be driven to crime as an option instead of hiring more police officers. What if we invest it in health care, drug treatment, housing? An educational and job opportunities and underserved communities. What if we paid more attention to who we elected as sheriffs and prosecutors? These people set the town for law enforcement within our communities. What if we called on our representatives and elected leaders to end the drug war? What if we ended pre trial attention so that only those who are accused of serious crimes and pose a real threat to the community are incarcerated? What if police misconduct, settlements came from police officers, salaries, the apartment budgets and their pension funds instead of city budgets? What if there was accountability at the community level from Civilian Police Review Boards? In late April, two thousand twenty one. The Department of Homeland Security, announced an internal audit to weed out racially motivated extremists in their ranks, citing them as the most pressing terrorism related threat to our country to day all branches of the military had a similar extremism stand down in two thousand and twenty one. How about we do the same for our law enforcement agencies nationwide, if their practices are indeed just, they should have nothing to hide. What if we dismantled the old way, while also building a better, more equitable system of community policing,...

...with intention an input for all the people it should be protecting and what, if good, cops just held bad cops accountable? If we finally addressed our racist history and confronted our ever present white Su premises, systems and institutions, maybe we just might reduce crime, violence and needless bloodshed for everyone. That' s all for today join me next time, as we shine a light on another shameful chapter of our country' s racist path. We can ' t beat the problem if We can' t see it. You' ve been listening to F your racist history. If you like what you' ve heard? Do us a favor and rate us on whichever platform you listen, it helps you can get more information on this and other episodes at F. U racist history, com for on your favorite podcast gap. Fur Racist history is produced by gold note and distributed by sounder. This episode was researched, fact, checked and written by Maggie come and Jasmine brand links to source material and references are included in the show notes. Our editor is Ken Pendola. Music is courtesy of flat foot. Fifty six Jamie Moler is our producer and I' m the executive producer and your host Christian Pechili. Thank you for joining, see you next time and is always f your racist history, a.

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